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Are you drinking enough water?

Saturday, August 04, 2012

Our bodies are primarily made up of water. It's almost a miracle what 8 to 10 eight-ounce glasses of water per day will do for your body. Water is the most important nutrient for our body, second only to that of oxygen. Studies have shown restriction of water promotes fat retention. Due to water's role in the removal of waste and transportation of nutrients, your body will perceive the lack of water as a major stress. One of the defense mechanisms of the body during major stress situations is to preserve fat and water. This can play havoc on a dieter's mind, mistaking the extra fluid retention for fat.
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  • GGMOM06
    emoticon i have to drink way more than usual and even more when i'm emoticon

    emoticon emoticon emoticon
    2798 days ago
  • NEWKATHYNOW
    emoticon
    2799 days ago
  • no profile photo CD12019534
    emoticon
    2800 days ago
  • no profile photo CD12756725
    I have learned the hard way of being dehydrated! Glad you telling everyone! emoticon
    2800 days ago
  • DOOBRIE
    I always make sure I get my water!

    emoticon
    2801 days ago
  • PATTERD707
    Thanks for sharing this.

    I've found, however, that drinking water has many other effects, such as feeling full, having something to drink that is calorie free (as opposed to soda), helping my mood (I get testy when I forget to drink water), regulating my hydration when I'm exercising.

    Apparently, however, the medical community is increasingly coming out against the 8 cup a day. To read more on the controversy, read here:
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/hea
    lth/story/2012/06/08/water-eigh
    t-glasses-myth.html
    2801 days ago
  • no profile photo CD12763504
    Here here! Time to fill up my water bottle. emoticon
    2801 days ago
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