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I want to start a journal - anybody?

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

Hi!

Quick question - how does a perfectionist keep a journal without giving up the first time she blots her ink, spells something wrong, handwriting looks gross, misses a day or two?

I know how laughable that sounds, by the way, but I do tend to get caught up with all of those things at one time or another.

On other news - I have managed to lose the same pound I keep gaining and losing. AAAARRRGGHHHH

I hope all is well
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  • SUSEEE
    I have journaled and found it to be effective. I didn't write something every day after the first week or so. After a few months, going back and reading the entries was enlightening for recognizing trends, themes, and even progress!
    52 days ago
  • FLASUN
    Susan.....Keeping a journal for me is just something that I can jot down the things I've accomplished for the day, or what I had done for the day.....almost like when my mother gave us diary's at age 6 to write in. Doesn't have to look perfect or written like a pro.....just do what you can.....I know emoticon emoticon
    52 days ago
  • BUTTONPOPPER1
    You've reminded me that I keep procrastinating about starting a journal. I'm a firm believer in journals and wish so deeply that I'd done it all my life. Even when you don't go back and read what you wrote many years ago, I find it's so much easier to remember things that I took the time to write about at the end of the day. I'm not a perfectionist about the look of the journal--my few are full of cross-outs and arrows and messy writing, but I just feel like I have to have something spectacular to write about in order to keep a journal. That just isn't true, though. Once I start writing, it usually turns into something meaningful, and it helps me see my life and experiences as important.

    Hope you're doing well.
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    53 days ago
  • JAZZEJR
    Might be a great exercise to reduce perfectionism. Learn to not let mistakes bother you.
    53 days ago
  • TCANNO
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    54 days ago
  • ARTJAC
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    54 days ago
  • PACEKA1
    I have journaled for years and have been known to tear out a page or two now and then. I have learned to just let the thoughts come and ignore the rest! Good luck!!!
    54 days ago
  • KAYDE53
    Good idea. Can’t offer any advice, because I don’t journal. emoticon emoticon
    54 days ago
  • JAMER123
    I would do a journal on the computer with Word or one of those programs. I can edit as I go along or delete. It helps with misspelling etc. One doesn't need to write a book. A sentence or 2 or many paragraphs. It's yours for your eyes and you can put anything there you want. When ready, it can be printed off and kept in a notebook. My journaling is my coloring and I then take the page from the book and place it in a notebook. That way I can see my progress.
    54 days ago
  • HARROWJET
    It is your journal. Perhaps you can make a mistake on purpose and after that you won't be as hard on yourself. One coach I had told me to just write for a short period of time and not to worry about spelling or other mistakes. Just do it. Anything improves with practice. emoticon
    54 days ago
  • CODEMAULER
    I recently started journalling. I'm a recovering perfectionist and here's what works for me:

    Timebox - set aside x minutes (whatever works for you) and write. Recall it was Hemingway that said the first draft of anything is sh*t. Revel in the blather!

    Use an ugly journal - beautiful books make me judge my work. It's hard enough to face the blank pages! Give yourself permission to scribble, doodle, cross-out because your beat-up spiral notebook won't care, It's just happy to be useful.

    Go forward - don't read your previous entries until a lot of time has passed. That way you focus on the future instead of reliving the moments that got you here.

    Give it 30 days - if it doesn't work, don't force it. It may not do anything for you, but you won't know in a week or two.

    I hope that helps; good luck!!
    54 days ago
  • LKWQUILTER
    I lost part of what I gained last week. We just keep on keeping on and one day it will be in the past and working on another pound. ((HUGS))
    54 days ago
  • PWILLOW1
    When you figure it out let me know. I have started one several times and before the second week is up I tear the pages out and shred them. Being a perfectionist is no fun. I consider it part of being OCD.
    54 days ago
  • no profile photo CHAYOR73
    Learning experience, just keep on going. emoticon
    55 days ago
  • SPARKPEOPLE1951
    Good luck on your journal. I know what you mean about losing a pound then gaining it back, Don't give up just keep thinking eating healthy and everything in moderation. I had the same problem but I just keep reminding myself to not limit anything but to enjoy my food. I try not to let food control me. Keep up the good work. We will eventually get there! emoticon
    55 days ago
  • GARDENCHRIS
    it is supposed to be messy, that is the point, so that you get all those feeling out, feelings are messy,
    55 days ago
  • NANASUEH
    If the perfectionism is holding you back, a digital journal is best. I've even used excel as the cells are already great divisions.

    If you're wanting the release that comes from physically writing the journal, maybe a compromise of writing a draft on the computer, then copying over to the paper. The downside is you lose the spontaneity that's supposed to be with journals.

    Experiment. You may discover the little errors of writing isn't as bad as you feared or that the freedom to correct errors in the digital form is the best.

    emoticon
    55 days ago
  • ANNEARIAS
    Lots of prayer
    55 days ago
  • EOWYN24241
    Have you considered and online journal?
    55 days ago
  • RO2BENT
    Continuous improvement
    55 days ago
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