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RUSTY_WOODS Posts: 967
11/28/19 7:33 P

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I know it is convenient, but anything in a box, is probably not as healthy as plain food. 100 mg is just under 4 ozs. ( 453 mg per lb ).. so protein should be around 20 g, not 31.

Even if you get regular chicken, wrapped in plastic at the grocery, look at sodium levels.. some are in a 15% salt water solution.. this can make the Na per serving 4x as much in some cases. You want it to be under 100 mg of Na per serving. Mine is 80. I shop at an Amish store, and the chicken is not frozen, and has nothing added to it. The stuff at the grocery can be as high as 340 mg per serving.

Read labels, find a brand you trust, and stick to it.



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11/17/19 6:34 P

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URBANREDNEK Posts: 11,431
11/17/19 12:13 P

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Aren't nutrition labels crazy confusing?! They can drive me nuts!

Here's the thing: the label on the package that you bought is giving the information for the items AS THEY ARE IN THE PACKAGE. In this case, raw (not cooked), boneless, and skinless. I can't find any info on the ingredients list, but the nutrition values (high sodium and lower protein) would tell me that these have been injected or marinated in salt water and maybe spices. That they show 19g protein for 100g portion (19% protein) while stating "16% meat protein" indicates that they have added some other protein source (usually soy) in the marinade / injection. Be careful to read the ingredients if you have any allergies, since these are NOT just plain chicken. Also, you will need to weigh your portion before cooking in order to get correct nutrition values for what you eat, and enter the data yourself to make sure that it is accurate.

If you chose to purchase just plain boneless, skinless chicken breast (not marinated / spiced), then the basic nutrition for it raw can be found here: nutritiondata.self.com/facts/poultry-produ
cts/701/2


The nutritional info that you found while searching is for plain boneless, skinless chicken breast that has already been cooked (roasted). It has more calories / nutrition per gram because some of the natural water has been cooked out of it. The basic nutrition list can be found here: nutritiondata.self.com/facts/poultry-produ
cts/703/2


The linked data is an average of typical commercially farmed broilers / fryers based on standard chicken feed. If you choose free range chicken, or chicken advertised as "high in Omega-3", or other "specialty" types, then you will need to get their nutritional information for the as-packaged (raw) meat, since there will be variation in protein, fat, and nutrient content.

I hope this helps!

Sir Terry Pratchett: "Science is not about building a body of known 'facts'. It is a method for asking awkward questions and subjecting them to a reality-check, thus avoiding the human tendency to believe whatever makes us feel good."

"The Inuit Paradox" ( discovermagazine.com/2004/oct/inuit-
paradox
): "...there are no essential foods—only essential nutrients. And humans can get those nutrients from diverse and eye-opening sources. "

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11/17/19 10:12 A

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I picked up a few boxes of 3kg Western Family Boneless Chicken Breasts because they were about 50% cheaper then the non-branded chicken breasts at my local supermarket. I noticed that the nutritional value of the Western Family chicken to be very different compared to the nutritional value that Google was saying. I am wondering if:

1) Is the Google chicken breast nutritional value search result roughly accurate?
2) The non-branded chicken breast will have roughly the same nutritional value as the Google search result?
3) Is Western Family chicken breast was processed so it contains much less nutritional value then a normal chicken breast?
4) The Western Family chicken breast box says that it has "16% meat protein". What does that mean?

Western Family chicken breast (per 100 g):
Calories: 100
Fat: 2.5 g
Sodium: 380 mg
Protein: 19 g

Google's chicken breast nutrition search result (per 100 g): Googled "chicken breast nutrition"
Calories: 165
Fat: 3.5 g
Sodium: 74 mg
Protein: 31 g

Western Family chicken: Googled "western family chicken breast frozen"
Non-branded chicken: Googled "chicken breast package"

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