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HOBOCHAN Posts: 26
5/20/09 4:53 A

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For anyone saying a vegetarian diet is lacking in certain nutrients, ask them what nutrients they're referring to. More than likely, they'll only mention protein (one of the three macronutrients, other than fat and carbohydrates). Most things have protein - even an apple has it.

The standard American eats four times the MAXIMUM recommended daily allowance, and that takes a huge toll on the kidneys. Also, I find when most people focus on meat as the star of the meal, they're missing out on whole grains and/or fruits and vegetables. Eating sans meat forces a lot of people to think along more nutritional lines because they feel they have to 'make up' for what they miss when they don't eat meat.

When it comes down to it, it's more a question of morality versus dietary concerns (for most people, anyway). If you feed a child well and correctly, it should be up to the vegetarian parent to feed them as they would themselves, then let the child make an informed decision when they are aware of what 'meat' means.

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LIZ0729 Posts: 22
5/11/09 2:45 P

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I became a vegetarian at the age of 10 (15 years ago) and I have now been vegan for over a year. My fiancÚ and I have discussed what to do when we have children, he eats meat and has said that he could never eat a meal without meat. I really believe in the health benefits of vegetarianism and strongly believe that our kids should be veg, as I want the best for them. I know when we start trying to have children this will be more of an issue for us, so I'm really going to have to do some research to show him that this would be better for them. Maybe he will start to think differently about what he eats too! I do think that when they get old enough to understand what they are eating that they are free to decide for themselves and I would respect their decision.

DANELLEVT Posts: 3
5/11/09 11:38 A

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My daughter turns 7 next week and has always been vegetarian, I am fortunate to have adopted my daughter as a single Mom so I had no one to compromise with on this issue. She has always been extremely healthy, she was the only child to go through the winter in kindergarten with a room full of kids sneezing, coughing and out sick and did not get sick. This year she has never been out at all. It can be difficult to avoid situations where she might be given products containing animals that they might not be aware of; marshmallows, jello, many cheeses etc. What I do tell them if she is out with them to a restaurant is not meat and no soup and I am very clear with them about how I feel. When she was a baby my father brought up my right to make those decisions for her and I pointed out the decisions he made for me regarding religion etc. It has taken time but I think they have come to appreciate the health benefits if nothing else, they even decided to feed their dog a vegetarian diet after they saw how healthy my dogs were (Honey was always on a vegetarian diet and lived 16 1/2 years - not bad for a yellow lab). My daughter and I talk about what meat and the conversation continually evolves. She starts her morning with Spiruteen in milk and calls it her chocolate milk, it is important that they start their day with protein and that with fruit and oatmeal it her Monday to Friday routine. I make soups with beans, lentils etc for lunch and in warmer weather we have sandwiches like hummus, tofurky etc. Good luck, it is well worth doing.

BETH_E Posts: 4
5/11/09 8:15 A

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My kids (3 & 5) and I are vegetarian, my husband eats meat occassionally (usually at lunch outside the home). I have always "named" meats as animals for my children (like, you can't have what grandpa is eating because that is cow or pig) and I don't think this is influencing them anymore than calling it "burger" is. I think they have a right to know what they are putting in their bodies. I have also started explaining to the older one the health and ecological benefits of being vegetarian. He understands the concept of "good for the planet" and is happy to contribute to it. I do realise that as they get older, they may choose to change their diet, but I at least know they will do it fully informed. The only advice I would offer is to find a family doctor / pediatrician who is supportive and well informed. A bad doctor will make you believe anything that goes wrong with your child's health is due to the lack of hamburgers...

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TAHOEDOS's Photo TAHOEDOS Posts: 15
5/10/09 10:19 P

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My husband eats meat very rarely, usually when we are out for dinner or if we have a potluck in which we are ok if our guests want to bring a meat dish for themselves he has eaten it. Our daughters, 2 and 8 have been raised vegetarian and my husband is very supportive. When we have been out for dinner and he orders a fish dish, the kids can try it, ask questions and we discuss why I am vegetarian and and have been for over 20 years. Even though he occasionally eats meat, he is very supportive of my reasons and he thinks it is best for the kids so he tends to be more vocal about why they shouldn't eat it. I actually promote my children to try anything they want but to always know what it is and where it came from. My 8 year old has tried fish on her own once when she was about 4. She has not once gone back to wanting to eat meat so far. Ultimately it will be their choice, so I look at my influence more as educating them rather than making the choices for them. My 2 year old has not had any meat to date. The kids have been raised around my meat eating family and friends and it hasn't turned out to be a problem. Everyone has been so used to me being vegetarian for so long, they tend to make sure I have something or I know to bring something, so the kids do just fine. When my eldest was a baby I noticed some resistance from primarily her pediatrician, but that also has since changed and everyone including her doctor is supportive.

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ZELDAK Posts: 1
5/10/09 8:15 P

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My kids are grown, 27 and 24 years old, and never ate meat in their lives. They were always at the top of the growth charts, were at the top of their classes (where 75% of the National Honor Society members were vegetarian - what does that tell you?!), and were very rarely ill. They are still vegetarians by choice, as they were told when they were old enough to make decisions for themselves that their diet away from home was up to them; as a matter of fact, my son did me one better by becoming a vegan. I do not allow meat in my house, except for cat food, because I do not consider it an ethical choice for humans. When the kids were very young and in the care of in-laws, I made it clear that they were only to eat vegetarian food, or it would be the last time they saw their grandkids. Harsh, but factual. I learned through years of experience with my in-laws that they did not respect my opinions on many matters, so I could not leave room for compromise on something as important as my children's health.

CLEOTHEMUSE's Photo CLEOTHEMUSE Posts: 36
5/9/09 8:35 P

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The best you can do is feed your child vegetarian food, make them aware of where meat comes from (one of my friends makes it a point to "introduce" his children to farm animals so they know that a cow is a burger), and refuse to fix meat for them when they get old enough to ask for it.

Most kids will see that eating meat means doing horrible things to animals...and because of that won't eat the meat.

The important thing to remember is that children are little humans. They need to choose their own path. If that means they decide to not be vegetarians, then we have to accept their decision. (Of course, I've never met a child raised by a vegetarian who decided to become a big meat eater later.)

Edited by: CLEOTHEMUSE at: 5/9/2009 (20:35)
Habit is habit and not to be flung out of the window by any man, but coaxed downstairs a step at a time.



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MCBR1201's Photo MCBR1201 Posts: 164
5/9/09 11:16 A

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I have thought about the same thing. My whole family is not vegetarian, and neither are any of my friends. It can be very frustrating. Althought I would love to raise my children vegetarian, I think i would be a challenge because my daughter is 5 and has been eating meat for 4 years, and my husband eats meat.

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SARAHAYSUCK Posts: 22
1/30/09 12:01 A

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Many cultures raise their children on vegetarian diets and raise healthy babies :)

My boyfriend was born in India and spent the first 10 years of his life as a total vegetarian, his brother the first 16, and his sister is still a vegetarian along with his mother. They are healthy and living well!

Once they moved to America the boys didn't keep up with vegetarianism. His mom does a similar thing as to what I'm hoping/planning to do with my children: They can eat meat if they want, but I won't be cooking any.

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KIMMYKUPCAKES's Photo KIMMYKUPCAKES Posts: 480
1/29/09 1:21 A

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My daughter has been a vegetarian since she was 7 years old. She decided to become one after I read some passages to her out of Fast Food Nation. She's 14 now. She hasn't had any problems growing or maturing. She's in great shape, very healthy, and barely gets sick. There has never been any problems or any kind of her becoming a vegetarian.

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ECOAGE's Photo ECOAGE Posts: 13,132
1/28/09 1:45 P

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My 12 year old son (13 in a couple of weeks ... where did the time go!!!) is and always has been a vegetarian. I am vegetarian and couldn't imagine feeding my baby boy anything that I wasn't willing to eat ... for both ethical or health reasons. My son is healthy, strong and tall ... always at the top of the growth charts. He is also compassionate and caring. (Characteristics developed as a vegetarian?)

My husband enjoys eating meat. We have been lucky, my whole family (including in-laws) respected our choice for a vegetarian lifestyle. No one ever tried to give my son meat to eat. He made it pretty clear that he was vegetarian at a very young age. For example, at a restaurant (when he was about 3 years) he laughed thinking his nana was joking when she ordered baked fish saying, "Fish are our pets. Fish swim in a bowl."

Playdates & social events have not been a problem. Given the frequency of food allergies and other food restrictions, friends' mom's always ask about food selections. A classroom friend is severely lactose intolerant; he has had more difficulty with parties than our lacto-ovo vegetarian child. He was never shy about stating his food preferences and could comfortably ask if something was made with meat or not. He might have had more than his share of mac n'cheese or pasta & butter at friends' houses but that's OK; he likes macaroni and so do his friends. Go to a kid's birthday party and expect cheese pizza (in my experience, it's the unusual kid who asks for anchovy or pepperoni or even mushrooms), cake and ice cream.

The most frequently asked question over the years, "What are you going to do if he goes to a ballgame and wants a hot dog?" He won't even eat a tofu pup so I will be VERY surprised if that would be his deciding factor to leave this side of the fence!

Good luck with your decision-making.

It takes a long time to grow young. - P. Picasso

Gail
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1/15/09 6:12 P

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I've been a vegetarian for over 28 years. My wife still eats meat.

When it came to my daughter I decided not to raise her vegetarian for 2 reasons. First, I'm not going to say anything negative about mom or her diet. I'm not going to tell her she can't eat meat when her mom does. Second, I don't want her to be an outcast who can't eat what her friends do when she is in daycare or visiting friends houses.

I do have a certain amount of regret about not pushing the vegetarianism thing a bit more. When my daughter was beginning to eat solid foods she did eat vegetarian. We just didn't give her meat. At that time she would eat everything we offered her. She loved sweet potatoes, avacado, peas, carots, green beans, broccoli etc. Then when she started eating what we ate mom gave her meat. As soon as she started eating meat she lost her interest in eating vegetables. At a typical meal she will eat all of her meat and not touch any vegetables. When she asks for more meat we usually bargain with her that she needs to eat one bite of vegetables before she gets any more meat. I hate to use food as rewards but otherwise I don't think any vegetables would pass her lips.

I wonder if we kept her eating vegetarian a bit longer before giving her meat that she would have had more of a habit of eating vegetables.

My wife thinks she might decide on her own to become a vegetarian when she is a teen. Her adult daughter from her previous marriage was a big meat eater until she saw cattle feed lots and became a vegetarian as a teen.

TERESA56082 Posts: 47
1/15/09 1:38 P

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If you and your spouse are disagreeing on being vegetarian do not let it be in front of your children and never try to influence your children to see the other parent as wrong. This will always backfire.
If you are doing the shopping and cooking then provide vegetarian meals. If your spouse feels strongly about the children eating meat he should shop and cook those meals. Your children will learn that respect for others and partnership are important and that is an important lesson.

As for the in-laws, unless your husband is willing to tell them they are not going to do it no matter what you say. If he is willing you are 90% of the way there. The rest is just showing them you are serious about this as a parenting decision the TWO of you have made.

TERESA56082 Posts: 47
1/15/09 1:28 P

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Both my husband and I are vegetarian. We have tried to be honest with our kids (7 and 10) about what meat is. My Mother tells me it is wrong to refer to meat as animals, muscle, cow, etc. since I am influencing them in how they make choices, but I argue back that it is my job to influence them. I can only control what they eat when they are with me so it is important that they know what things are so they can make good decisions at school or a friend's (or my Mother's) house.

I don't see it as any different than taking them to the church I have chosen or any of the other moral lessons I try to teach them.

Edited by: TERESA56082 at: 1/15/2009 (13:30)
SAPBEAR's Photo SAPBEAR Posts: 212
1/15/09 10:25 A

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I'm a vegetarian and my dh isn't, but he supports my lifestyle and we do not have any meat in the house (although I have always maintained, he can buy/cook/clean up after any meat he wants, he just hasn't exercised that option in our 12 years of marriage). We have 8 and 10 year old boys. We agreed to not offer them meat, but we wouldn't say no if they asked to eat meat. When my 10 year old was two, he tried a bite of bacon at my parents house, but didn't want anymore. And my 8 year old when he was 1 grabbed a tiny piece of chicken of my mom-in-law's plate at a restaurant, but that is their extent to their meat exposure. They are both very healthy and well educated on the benefits of being vegetarians. I have had to talk to them that we must respect other people's food choices as we expect them to respect ours, so they are curbing their lecturing now. They may eat meat later, but I am happy that they have chosen to remain vegetarian this long and I have no concerns about their diet. Fortunately, my in-laws and parents had to deal with my vegetarianism for years prior to the boys, so they weren't surprised and have been mostly supportive. It's easier now that the boys can ask questions for themselves when we visit friends and family, so I don't have to watch as carefully anymore.
Good luck!

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IMAVEGGIE Posts: 60
1/15/09 7:27 A

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I agree with POTRIDGE. At some point, kids will decide whether or not to remain vegetarians. I think they should have this right. Fingers crossed they choose to stay veggie ;)

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POTRIDGE's Photo POTRIDGE Posts: 5,280
1/15/09 12:45 A

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When kids reach a certain age, they question everything! You and your hubby will have to plan ahead for when that time comes. When they get to school and they see the other kids eating meat as well, they might have the urge to try it. They will decide if it is for them or not. Give them all of your knowledge for now and hopefully they will make the right decision.

DIET IS A FOUR LETTER WORD!!!!

We are constantly creating our "karma" or destiny through our intentions, thoughts and deeds in this moment. It is achieved through countless deliberate acts of selflessness.

It's hard to be happy with others if we are not happy with ourselves.

Just keep on moving and you'll get there.


If you ever want to feel good about yourself, go out and help someone else!


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PICKEB21 Posts: 5
1/15/09 12:32 A

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I appreciate all your posts on this. My husband and I talked about it and decided are kids will be vegetarian, so I'm relieved about that. However, my husband refuses to give up meat himself and I'm concerned about the obstacles this may create in the future (once my kids are old enough to question why he eats meat). Do you think this will compromise my kids being veggies down the road? Will meat be like a forbidden fruit to them? Should I try to convince my husband to give up meat (I can honestly say I don't see it happening)? If any of you have a similar situation I'd love to hear your input. Thanks everyone!

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VIRGINIADVINE Posts: 8
1/14/09 5:17 P

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It is BETTER to raise your child vegan. The benefits of a vegan diet for you are quite similar (and in some cases even greater) for your children.
Just ensure that your getting enough B12 so that when breastfeeding your child gets it as well. Make sure to supplement it in the future.


"Getting Your Vitamins
While you're breastfeeding it is extremely important to make sure you are getting all the nutrients you need in your own diet. Your baby is counting on you to provide her with all the nutrients she needs to grow at a healthy rate. While getting a well balanced diet and sufficient vitamin intake is of extreme importance while breastfeeding, the following two vitamins are of particular concern to vegan women. Be absolutely sure you are getting enough of these:

* Vitamin B12 - Babies are born with zero to little stores of this important vitamin. B12 will pass through your breastmilk in sufficient quantities ONLY if you're getting plenty in your own diet. If you are not 100% sure you're getting enough yourself, consider giving your infant a liquid B12 supplement from the time she is 2 weeks old until you stop breastfeeding.
* Vitamin D - Get out into the sunshine! If you can't get 10-15 minutes per day of sunshine, or 20-30 minutes two to three times per week, then you must be sure to get enough Vitamin D in your diet. Good sources of this vitamin are found in fortified non-dairy beverages. Let your baby's skin get some sunshine too, but be very careful not to expose your infant to too much sunlight because of the damaging effects of ultraviolet light. If you live in colder climates and aren't sure you're getting enough Vitamin D, you can supplement. Find Vitamin D2 because that is plant derived. Vitamin D3 is from an animal source.

Advantages of Breastfeeding
The well known advantages of breastfeeding your infant include providing natural immunity against numerous diseases, fewer ear infections, less allergies, less gastrointestinal disorders, lower incidence of SIDS, and a decreased risk of contracting diabetes. One lesser known advantage is that the breastmilk of vegan women is refreshingly void of toxins that are found in large quantities in the breastmilk of non-vegan women. Breastfeeding is also better for the environment as there is no waste or pollution. And, of course, breastfeeding is much better for the animals, who'd like to keep their milk for their own babies."

Resources:
La Leche League Website
The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding by Gwen Gotsch and Judy Torgus
The Breastfeeding Book by Martha Sears R.N. and William Sears M.D.
Pregnancy, Children, and the Vegan Diet by Michael Klaper, M.D.
Becoming Vegan by Brenda Davis, R.D. and Vesanto Melina, M.S., R.D.


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JULIELSA's Photo JULIELSA Posts: 366
1/14/09 12:35 P

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Both my DH & I are veggies. We have 2 kids that are also veggies. People are always trying to make us see things from their point of view about why they should not be veggies and how it is not healthy for kids. Well let me tell you, my kids are 13 & 11 and they have never had any more than the common cold, no allergies and are always happy. I would like to think that this has something to do with their diet. They are proud to be veggies and they are the first to say why they don't eat animals.

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BUGGIE726's Photo BUGGIE726 SparkPoints: (0)
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1/14/09 10:39 A

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It is perfectly healthy to have children be vegetarian. You're probably going to have to educate them on the amount of protein and other nutrients that they think your children can't possibly get not eating meat. Then you have to be firm and tell them no meat. Or else.

**~~June~~**

"I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be." Douglas Adams
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*



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CAROL-'s Photo CAROL- Posts: 12,456
1/14/09 5:40 A

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I am the only vegetarian in my house. My family is very supportive. I continue to try to educate them and they tease me in fun but they are seeing the health changes in my life. They are eating more and more like me as time passes.

I have had to be strong in my decision. Live by example and when the opportunity presents itself, I take that opportunity to educate.

I am constantly picked on at work because I also food combine. But I am the one that is healthy!

Be strong! It's about you, your family and being healthy.





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1/13/09 11:18 P

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My daughter is 16 months old. I am veggie. My husband isn't. We had months of debate about whether or not she would eat meat. We finally came to the compromise of she can eat fish 2-3 times a week. However, I don't cook it. So she only gets it when my husband makes it for her which is actually only once every week or two.

She is very healthy baby. In her 16 months she has had only 2 colds. One time she had a minor fever for about 24 hours. That's it. No other illnesses in her life. And she keeps busting the top off all the growth charts.

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RAINDROPS8's Photo RAINDROPS8 SparkPoints: (0)
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1/13/09 10:34 P

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www.care2.com/c2c/groups/disc.html?g
pp
=4121&pst=120233

here is a link i search when my granddaughter was born, at her house she eats everything except red meat.
my house she becomes vegetarian i still feed her her milk but the rest of the foods are vegan. funny thing she loves the vegan recipes ( i cooked them kid friendly)since she is not my child i can't ask for her to be vegan which i know is the best way to go. but when she is with me i feed her vegan foods. good luck. i have not read the china study perhaps he talks about vegan kids.


When I consider the virtue of abusive words,
I find the scandal-monger is my good teacher. If we do not become angry at gossip, We have no need for powerful endurance and compassion. To be mature in Zen is to be
mature in expression,
And full-moon brilliance of dhyana and prajna
Does not stagnate in emptiness. Not only can I take hold of complete
enlightenment by myself, But all Buddha-bodies, like sands of the Ganges, Can become awakened in exactly the the some way
POTRIDGE's Photo POTRIDGE Posts: 5,280
1/13/09 9:54 P

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My niece and nephew have been veggies since they were born. They are 25, 18, and 15 years old now. Healthy as horses! You just have to know how to do it. It takes time and patience. Sadly for questions 2 and 3, you can not change someone's mind if they don't want to. My hubby hates my eating habits and hates that one of my sons has followed in my footsteps. You can't keep an eye on your in-laws. Have a talk with them, tell them your feelings, and hope for the best. Send food with your kids when your in-laws watch them. Good luck!

DIET IS A FOUR LETTER WORD!!!!

We are constantly creating our "karma" or destiny through our intentions, thoughts and deeds in this moment. It is achieved through countless deliberate acts of selflessness.

It's hard to be happy with others if we are not happy with ourselves.

Just keep on moving and you'll get there.


If you ever want to feel good about yourself, go out and help someone else!


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LIVINHEALTHY9's Photo LIVINHEALTHY9 SparkPoints: (449,932)
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1/13/09 9:53 P

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I am the only vegetarian in my house. My hubby and step sons are not. They do eat vegetarian meals when I prepare them for them. Otherwise, I make them one thing and I eat something else.
I would say research the internet to get all the info you can. Yes, kids can be healthy vegetarians, absolutely. But, I think you will need evidence to show your hubby and family members.
As far as making sure your in laws follow this, I don't think you can. All you can do is tell them your wishes and ask that they abide by them.

Jackie
Northern Ky.


"No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another."
-Charles Dickens (1812-1870)

"Most people don't change until the pain of staying the same is greater than the pain of changing."



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PICKEB21 Posts: 5
1/13/09 9:17 P

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Hi everyone,

I've been a vegetarian for almost 7 years. I have a 2 1/2 yr old son who is not a vegetarian and a 5 month old who obviously has never had meat. My husband is supportive of my vegetarianism (he has no choice!) but he and his family, as well as mine, are all big meat eaters. I'm considering putting my children on a vegetarian diet but I'm meeting resistance from my husband. Here are my questions:
1. Is it really healthy for kids to be vegetarians?
2. How do I convince my husband and family of its merits and overcome criticism?
3. How do I make sure my in-laws abide by my dietary rules when they are taking care of my children?

If any of you have experience with this, I'd love to have your input.

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