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One thing you can do for a better lung function...

Wednesday, March 10, 2021

.... Is to avoid processed meat.

"Nitrites are added to processed meats as preservatives to preserve their pink (....)

Frequent cured meat consumption is associated with increased risk for developing diseases like emphysema (...) ––a form of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Eating it like every other day appeared to triple the odds of severe COPD. (....)

Currently, we now have studies involving hundreds of thousands of people, showing that higher intakes of processed meat were associated with a 40 percent increased risk of COPD. It comes out to like an 8 percent higher risk of COPD for each hot dog you eat a week, or each weekly breakfast link sausage. (....)

The way nitrites appear to cause lung damage is by affecting connective tissue proteins like collagen and elastin. That’s what helps keep the airspaces in your lungs open, but nitrite can modify these proteins in a way that mimics age-related damage, including the fragmentation of elastin.

(...) cured meat consumption increases risk of COPD patients ending up back in the hospital, about twice the risk for those eating more than average, and it appears the more you eat, the worse it is.

Regarding lung health, processed meat intake has been associated with a likely increased risk of lung cancer, a decline in lung function, and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. But, what about asthma? High processed meat consumption has been associated with higher asthma symptoms as well.

We knew about higher maternal intake of meat before pregnancy, potentially increasing the risk of wheezing in her children later on (based on a study of more than a thousand mother-child pairs). (...)
Those who ate the most cured meats were 76 percent more likely to experience worsening asthma than those who ate the least. (....) .... Put all the studies together, and processed meat intake appears to be an important target for the prevention of adult asthma in the first place.

Even if you don’t have any lung issues, processed meat consumption was negatively associated with measures of normal lung function, while fruit and vegetable consumption and dietary total antioxidant capacity was associated with better lung function.

But wait, you say. I just eat all natural, uncured hot dogs, with NO NITRATES OR NITRITES ADDED, in all caps. But if you put a magnifying glass to the small print, it says “except those naturally occurring in… cultured celery juice.” (...).... what they do is add something that has a lot of nitrates, like celery, and bacteria that convert the nitrates to nitrites. So, they are adding nitrites. They’re just straight-up duping consumers. (...) ...
Europe doesn’t allow this kind of consumer fraud, demanding manufacturers explicitly label it as containing nitrites. You can’t even call it natural.

When Consumer Reports put it to the test, they found the nitrite levels in all the products were essentially the same; so “no nitrites” doesn’t mean no nitrites. (....)"

nutritionfacts.org/video
/the-effects-of-processed-
meat-on-lung-function/
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Member Comments About This Blog Post
  • MRSLIVINGWELL
    Fake lunchmeats and cheeze aren't much better at keeping you healthy either. I've been able to be happy with bean burger or chickpea salad sandwiches as an alternative to the usual American sandwich.

    I appreciate Dr. Gregor and his research. I'd heard people say they were eating nitrate-free meats/bacon for absorbitant prices thinking they were healthier.

    Mrslivingwell

    McDougall Plan Coleader
    60 days ago
  • MRSLIVINGWELL
    Fake lunchmeats and cheeze aren't much better at keeping you healthy either. I've been able to be happy with bean burger or chickpea salad sandwiches as an alternative to the usual American sandwich.

    I appreciate Dr. Gregor and his research. I'd heard people say they were eating nitrate-free meats/bacon for absorbitant prices thinking they were healthier.

    Mrslivingwell

    McDougall Plan Coleader
    60 days ago
  • 1CRAZYDOG
    Thank you for that enlightening link. I do not eat much red meat @ all and do not eat processed meats. I do have alergies, which are NOT thought to be hereditary . . . but my Mom smoked while pregnant with me, and they at processed meats a lot (not lots of money, and of course, processed meats are cheaper!) Anyhow, thanks for the informaiton.
    65 days ago
  • LETSGOPLAY
    I am glad you passed this along. I was just telling my DH this this morning. I am super grateful Dr. Greger passes his info along because for the longest time I thought that kind of processed meat was ok. Now- NO it is not a healthy choice. Anything we can do for the health of our lungs at this time I am all for!
    SO interesting about nitrates to nitrites.

    Of course nitric oxide is fantastic! DH and I enjoy beets just about every day!!

    as for the Ice Boy- I will go check that out. Humans do need to eat to survive and I am grateful our bodies can eat all kinds of things when needed. We even have emergency type back up for times of starvation such as using ketones. Body is amazing. I am also glad that we can make more healthful choices for ourselves and this planet as we only have the one- body and planet. When we all pitch in and make thoughtful choices we will have a a better world.

    "We should all be eating fruits and vegetables as if our lives depend on it - because they do."
    Michael Greger emoticon
    65 days ago

    Comment edited on: 3/10/2021 11:04:12 AM
  • JIBBIE49
    Have you seen the YT story on the poor Chinese boy who walked 3 miles to school in the mountains and came in with frozen hair? He was called the Ice Boy. The story got out and a lot of money was raised for him and his sister and father. They now have a herd of goats and the mother came back and they got a new house. When the reporter ask him what the best thing was now that they have money he said "We get to eat MEAT!!!


    66 days ago
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