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ALUKOWSKY's Photo ALUKOWSKY SparkPoints: (20,650)
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7/18/19 11:05 A

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Thank you so much! I look forward to giving this a try. Thanks for the hints too.

The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.


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URBANREDNEK Posts: 13,445
7/18/19 12:18 A

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I haven't tried this myself (I'm quite happy with dairy), but your question piqued my curiosity.

I make my own dairy yogurt and all that is required for "Greek" style is to drain it (I use a muslin towel in a colander). It is acid whey that is drained out, which has known average nutritional content, so it is quite simple to calculate the rough nutrient content of the final product by deducting the nutrients of drained acid whey from the nutrients of the initial milk used. I'm cheap (or frugal if you want to be kind!) and enjoy my yogurt a little less thick than most commercial "Greek" yogurts, so I generally end up with yogurt that weighs 37%-45% of the initial milk weight (depending on how long I drain it), which gives me 8g-10g of protein per 125g (instead of the 13g in commercial). I would need to drain it down to about 29% of the initial milk weight in order to match the commercial protein levels, and that gives me far less of a savings, far less yogurt, far more whey than I can use up - so I am happy to compromise on a slightly lower protein content.

Now, what I went looking for with regard to your question was any information on what exactly it would be that you would drain from soy "yogurt" in order to get the thickness and consistency of "Greek" style. If it is just water, with little or no nutrients, then the draining is going to retain the original proteins in less weight, so your "protein per serving" will be higher. If, however, some of the protein drains out (as it does with the acid whey with dairy - not much, but some), then it could have an impact on final nutrient counts. I was totally unsuccessful in finding any information on what the liquid component of a fermented soy "yogurt" actually is, what it is called, and what the nutrient make-up would be. If somewhere-in-the-ballpark nutritional information is important to you, then you might have to do some digging with a food science department to see whether there is any information on the liquid.

I did discover that there are a couple of quirks to making soy "yogurt" instead of dairy.

The first is that soy doesn't work as well with the same bacterial cultures as dairy does, so it is important to use a probiotic culture that is specific for use with soy for best results. Some folks use cultures purchased separately, some folks use some purchased plain commercial soy yogurt, and some folks use specific probiotic capsules that they break open.

The second is that soy doesn't contain enough of the right kind of carbs for full fermentation that you get with the lactose in dairy. This is why many vegan cultures will come complete with a sugar source, such as brown rice syrup or rice maltodextrin, or a prebiotic fibre source such as inulin. A few vegan blog sites also recommend using a separate sugar or prebiotic fibre source along with the probiotic capsule for best results.

Final quirk is that soy just doesn't have the same chemical and physical composition as dairy, and so doesn't have the same texture in the final product. Those using it without draining seem to be in agreement that a thickening agent (agar, guar, xanthan gum) is a requirement for an enjoyable texture. Those who choose to drain it for a "Greek" style are more split on whether or not a gum is required, since some are quite happy with the natural drained result.

All told, it looks like it will be a fun experiment to try different things until you hit upon what YOU really like! I find that using my Instant Pot with "yogurt" setting is the fastest and easiest (no individual pots to fuss with, and it holds the perfect fermenting temps), and it will work just as well for non-dairy choices.

Oh - and final "quirk" is that lots of folks seem convinced that homemade soy milk, made with just soy and water, is your best base for soy "yogurt", so that might be your first project to tackle!

An interesting read: www.sciencedirect.com/topics/agricultural-
and-biological-sciences/soy-yogurt


A reputable source for cultures: shop.culturesforhealth.com/collections/yog
urt/products/vegan-yogurt-starter


Thanks for sending me off on an enjoyable learning experience emoticon I hope you have a good time experimenting and come up with an end result that you really enjoy!

Sir Terry Pratchett: "Science is not about building a body of known 'facts'. It is a method for asking awkward questions and subjecting them to a reality-check, thus avoiding the human tendency to believe whatever makes us feel good."

"The Inuit Paradox" ( discovermagazine.com/2004/oct/inuit-
paradox
): "...there are no essential foods—only essential nutrients. And humans can get those nutrients from diverse and eye-opening sources. "

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ALUKOWSKY's Photo ALUKOWSKY SparkPoints: (20,650)
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7/17/19 2:03 P

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OK thanks; I'll check them out. Still hoping to get tips from Sparkies who've actually done it though; they can maybe provide hints and advise me of potential pitfalls.

The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.


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SPARK_COACH_JEN's Photo SPARK_COACH_JEN Posts: 67,129
7/16/19 6:20 P

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I don't have any expertise in this area, but I Googled "how to make Greek yogurt with soy milk" and a number of results popped up.

Hope that helps,

Coach Jen

"You may have a fresh start any moment you choose, for this thing that we call "failure" is not the falling down but the staying down." Mary Pickford

"No matter how slow you go, you are still lapping everyone on the couch."
ALUKOWSKY's Photo ALUKOWSKY SparkPoints: (20,650)
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7/16/19 1:27 P

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This is actually several questions in one. I love yogurt and eat primarily fat-free Greek-style yogurt for its higher protein content. However, I would like to wean myself off dairy products for ethical reasons. I want to learn how to make my own yogurt; so
1) what do I have to do to it to get the "Greek" style, and
2) Is it possible to make yogurt from soymilk instead of cow's milk?

The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.


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