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-JAMES-'s Photo -JAMES- Posts: 14,246
4/30/16 12:46 P

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My COSTCO has large packages of almonds, but not almond flour. I'll have another careful look the next time I'm at COSTCO.
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James
Alberta, Canada


All time highest weight : 217 pounds

Starting weight : 195.0 pounds (June 7, 2012)
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KOIGAL Posts: 2
4/29/16 8:00 P

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Our Costco here in Victoria BC carries almond flour

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-SPIRITSEEKER2-'s Photo -SPIRITSEEKER2- Posts: 30,813
6/13/15 9:55 A

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do not have that store here

Fluffy in SC
5% winter challenge
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CATHOLICCORGI's Photo CATHOLICCORGI Posts: 5,643
6/12/15 9:19 P

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We have Earth Fare stores where I live, and they have had even better prices on flour than the WalMart... go figure!

Step into the unknown with confidence! Trust that in the darkness of that first step there will either be something solid to stand on, or you will be taught how to fly!
Nothing tastes as good as living with less pain feels!


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-SPIRITSEEKER2-'s Photo -SPIRITSEEKER2- Posts: 30,813
6/12/15 1:34 P

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amazon has great prices for almond flour and other kinds too ..

Fluffy in SC
5% winter challenge
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STARSHINE119's Photo STARSHINE119 Posts: 138
12/28/14 2:41 P

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Brenda,
I have made the Basic Focaccia and a few others. I made some the other night but didn't have chickpea flower so used 1 cup almond flour 1 cup flaxmeal and 1/2 cup tapioca flour. I am going to stop using Tapioca but I have a little left and will add small amounts to other things until it's gone. One thing I do a lot for things I want to rise is add psyllium powder. Dr. Davis has it in one recipe but I use it a lot. I tried Almond bread years ago for my gut but it always fell and was dense. I add about 1/8-1/4 cup for a bread recipe and it rises. I especially use it for muffins. I do like the items I make they taste good and fill me up for a long time. Hope this helps. I have used coconut flour too but not lately, just getting back to this diet. Some grocery stores sell Bob's Red Mill both Almond flour and flaxmeal, or try a health food store. You can also get them online at places like amazon. Or you can grind your own almonds.
Good luck!

Edited by: STARSHINE119 at: 12/28/2014 (14:49)
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-JAMES-'s Photo -JAMES- Posts: 14,246
12/16/14 2:34 A

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GENE1955
I use a kitchen aid food processor model KFP0711CU.
www.amazon.ca/KitchenAid-KFP0711CU-P
ro
cessor-Contour-Silver/dp/B007P205QU


It has lasted me about 18 months so far. I use the propellor blade inside. I start with a handful of almonds, when medium finely chopped I add another handful and build up handful by handful. I don't fill it up and turn it on and expect it to handle all the stress at once.

Before that I bought an official seed and nut grinder, but more a coffee bean sort of thing and it burned out. I thought it was defective and they replaced it with another one, which also burned out after another month. I decided not to get a third one and switched to the bigger beefier kitchenaid one.

James
Alberta, Canada


All time highest weight : 217 pounds

Starting weight : 195.0 pounds (June 7, 2012)
Final weight : 168.2 pounds (July 23, 2013)


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JANNEBARN's Photo JANNEBARN Posts: 225
12/15/14 10:06 A

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Recent resources I found helpful are "GRAIN BRAIN" by David Perlmutter, "Wheat Belly Total Health" by William Davis and for fermenting foods, a cookbook called "Bar Tartine: Recipes and Techniques".


Edited by: JANNEBARN at: 12/16/2014 (09:47)
"We are on the outskirts of Looneyland, heading towards city center." - The Vicar of Dibley


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CD9406101 Posts: 8,761
12/15/14 9:03 A

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James,
What do you use to grind nuts into flour?

SUGARFREEBIE Posts: 540
6/25/14 10:52 A

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For anyone who lives west of KC (other than in CA)--check out Natural Grocers. They stock many of the same products as Whole Foods at better prices. I found almond meal there in their refrigerated section for about $6.50 lb, will be getting that when my current stash runs out. They don't have a U-Bag bulk dept so for those things I go to Whole Foods (both in the same shopping center where I live--go figure). I got coconut flour yesterday in WF's bulk dept (didn't want to buy a lot; most of the recipes I've seen don't use very much) for $4/lb; same brand packaged is well over $6/lb. Already have a BIG stash of flaxseed meal so now I should be good to go using some of Dr Davis' recipes--bon appetit.

Peace out,
Mary S.


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-JAMES-'s Photo -JAMES- Posts: 14,246
6/23/14 1:00 A

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BLAZINGSWORD,
I've bought almonds in pretty big bags at COSTCO and ground them up to make almond flour. I know that somewhere in the world they sell it already ground, but I grind my own.

I burned out two light duty nut grinders, but my third more robust one has been doing just fine for over a year.

Here is a muffin recipe with ground almond flour:
www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/team_mes
sa
geboard_thread.asp?board=25210x58980R>x51709335


Just 3 grams of carbs per muffin. I focus on grams of carbs to keep my blood sugar under control ( so sorry about your friend).

Edited by: -JAMES- at: 6/23/2014 (01:03)
James
Alberta, Canada


All time highest weight : 217 pounds

Starting weight : 195.0 pounds (June 7, 2012)
Final weight : 168.2 pounds (July 23, 2013)


 current weight: 169.0 
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BLAZINGSWORD's Photo BLAZINGSWORD SparkPoints: (31,685)
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6/22/14 12:45 P

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Thanks Vicki. I will have to check into it. Right now I have a friend who is in Johns Hopkins whom I must visit today. Dying from complications of diabetes.

If you see a turtle sitting on top of a fencepost, you know he had help getting there. ~ John Maxwell

�.�*��) �.�*�) �.�*�)
(�. ~ brenda . ~��)
(�.��~ (�.�* ~ (�.�*


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EXOTEC's Photo EXOTEC Posts: 3,327
6/22/14 11:03 A

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I've never made my own nut flours, but the procedure doesn't look complicated. I buy mine in the regular grocery, in the "health" section. I can find it in bulk in our local independent grocer too, or online. I'm certain you could get some via Amazon. Here's some links to one of the most popular vendors:

www.amazon.com/Bobs-Red-Mill-Organic
-1
6-Ounce/dp/B000KENKZ8/ref=sr_1_3?ie=R>UTF8&qid=1403449438&sr=8-3&keywords=
co
conut+flour


www.amazon.com/Bobs-Red-Mill-Almond-
16
-ounces/dp/B00473RWXY/ref=sr_1_4?s=gR>rocery&ie=UTF8&qid=1403449548&sr=1-4
&k
eywords=almond+flour



I haven't used the Wheat Belly recipes, but I have a small volume called "Cooking With Coconut Flour" by a man by the name of Fife...

www.amazon.com/Cooking-Coconut-Flour
-G
luten-Free-Alternative/dp/0941599884R>/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1403
44
9624&sr=1-1&keywords=cooking+wit
h+coco
nut+flour+fife


it's not a "gourmet" cookbook. It's a very basic thing describing the different techniques and qualities of coconut flour cooking, and the simple recipes were created for, not adapted to, that base. It also is available from Amazon. Good everyday recipes. I encourage you to at least look for it and see if you would use the recipes. You might be able to find a copy at a trade store, flea market, or even in your library. Worth the time to check!

Edited by: EXOTEC at: 6/22/2014 (11:14)
...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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BLAZINGSWORD's Photo BLAZINGSWORD SparkPoints: (31,685)
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6/21/14 11:34 P

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Thanks Vicki. Basically I am eating less carbs. And eating more veggies and fruits again. And so since early April I've lost 11 pounds. So as long as I am continuing to lose, and have cut out most of the carbs, I will do fine.

Has anyone made their own almond or coconut flour? Has anyone made any of the recipes in the Wheat Belly cookbook using these flours? If so, how did you like those particular recipes?

Thanks in advance for any info.

brenda

If you see a turtle sitting on top of a fencepost, you know he had help getting there. ~ John Maxwell

�.�*��) �.�*�) �.�*�)
(�. ~ brenda . ~��)
(�.��~ (�.�* ~ (�.�*


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EXOTEC's Photo EXOTEC Posts: 3,327
6/21/14 7:44 P

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BLAZINGSWORD ~ you certainly have your plate full! I'm sorry to hear all the troubles.

And you're right about the "healthy whole wheat". The bran layer is where all the antinutrients reside, unfortunately. And, if you're sensitive to wheat, you're likely cross-reactive with other grains too - not just gluten.

We only eat small amounts of steel-cut oats, and that only rarely. I'm a rice fanatic, and I hardly eat any of that anymore either, even though it's technically a grass, not truly a grain as we know it.

Great to hear you've read the Wheat Belly book. There's so many other good resources on modern nutrition - not just the standard fare we get from official sources. Keep researching. You'll likely find that very many things we're pushed toward are exactly the things we ought to be avoiding. Soy is another of those things. Bad stuff, unless it's fermented.

You can regain your health if you learn how to eat. The first thing is real, whole foods. And then you'll just have to test your own responses to see what's healthy for you. You'll discover it - it may take a bit of time, but you have the time anyway... you may as well use it to good effect!

Health and happiness
~vicki~

...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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BLAZINGSWORD's Photo BLAZINGSWORD SparkPoints: (31,685)
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6/21/14 2:04 P

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Hi! I am new. I just finished reading "Wheat Belly" and also have the cookbook, a very belated birthday gift from my sister.

I basically am like doing The South Beach Diet, some Mediterranean, and low carb. Been through a lot in the past few years. Long story short, hubby & I basically never ate fats, creams, sauces, or gravies, & nothing fried. This was when I first married him 30 years ago.

However, we ate "white". But he took up smoking and sucking up sodas. It was only when his 2 colleagues & former bosses passed away, (1 from heart attack, the other from pancreatic cancer), did he clean up his act. Went to a nutritionist who advised switching from white to brown, which we did. He took up running, (did 2 Boston, plus numerous others), bicycling, and doing some weights at the "Y". Me, I did the South Beach and did what I could with elliptical at the "Y" and walking on a treadmill at home. But I had Splenda in the Swiss Miss Hot Chocolate I was drinking a lot of it at work during the cold months but the Splenda in it almost killed me. Had to be put on prednisone and report back to the doctor for clearance. I blistered everywhere there was a crevice: behind the knees, the elbows, everywhere. So I really don't do any types of artificial sweeteners at all now.

Then a couple of years later he developed chlorangiocarcinoma, (bile duct cancer), which was one hair away from pancreatic. He underwent chemo pill form, radiation, and the Whipple surgery which is generally done for both bile & pancreatic surgery. He lived for almost 6 years before succumbing a year ago last March.

So even though we had been eating healthy for almost like 8 years, it has been very hard for me to shake the sweet tooth at times, and then the carbs, although they were suppose to be healthy, were wheat noodles, wheat crackers, wheat this & that.

Then I broke out with lichen planus in my mouth which was due to, doctors are not sure what but the possibilities are: stress from the years of caring for hubby, autoimmune, and or allergic reaction & inflammation. But was told by the oral surgeon: no acidic fruits or tomatoes or juices, nothing spicy, & nothing hot temperature wise. The right side of the inside of my mouth had blistered and peeled; and there were outbreaks of spotty pimples on the inside as well. Not many but enough. And my nails on my fingertips became ridged.

As a result I ate a lot of noodles with shredded cheese & butter. Baked potatoes with cheese & butter. Anything that was soft. Cream of mushroom soup, cream of chicken soup. It was like this for about a year.

So now that the lichen planus seems to have subsided, although I still will not eat anything spicy, hot temperature wise, or acidic, but I am back on The South Beach and doing Mediterranean, and closely watching my carbs.

Right now I am working with my health care provide & advocate in more of portion control & using a pedometer to walk everyday.

Now I am at the place in my life where I just want to be healthy & stay that way. (I lost my mom to diabetes. My BIL has it with neuropathy in his feet. He is 1/2 Cherokee and is the remaining member of his native family, all of whom have passed away from complications of diabetes. I have a friend who is 70 but looks like 90 in Hopkins suffering from a broken hip which was repaired but because she is diabetic has so many complications with heart, RA, allergies, you name it she has it. I don't think she is going to be able to come out of the hospital, do rehab or even come home. Then another lady got the shock of her life yesterday and she just turned 50, she was diagnosed with diabetes. She fell several weeks ago and knock a dent in the front of her shin bone on her back deck step. Painful, tender, swollen to the touch, and red. Not fractured or chipped. Diabetes. I could have said something to her about her weight but didn't dare to. Her daughter in late teens is heading down the same way. My heart breaks for them.)


I have lost 11 pounds since the beginning of April this year and inches all over. I believe my sister wanted to give me Wheat Belly and the Wheat Belly cookbook because of the inflammation I had encountered with the lichen planus.

After having read Wheat Belly, it doesn't surprise me. It goes along with the other books I have read: Prediabetes for Dummies, Diabesity by Francine Kaufman, M.D., and YOU: On A Diet. Plus several others. But these really puts it into perspective.

NOW I FIND OUT that wheat is not the healthy whole grain that it is cracked up to be. Sheesh!

I am gamed to try the recipes recommend in Wheat Belly. I like to cook and generally eat at home. But I am at a lost as to how to make almond flour or even know if I could purchase it any where? I haven't checked my local organic food market yet. Guess I should start there.

Has anyone tried any of the recipes in Wheat Belly, especially ones made with almond flour? If so, did you make your own or purchase the almond flour?

Also, I do not use artificial sweeteners of any kind because of previous reaction to Splenda, which has a chemical structural makeup similar to DEET.

If you have any suggestions or ideas I am open to hearing from you. Thanks for your time & patience.

If you see a turtle sitting on top of a fencepost, you know he had help getting there. ~ John Maxwell

�.�*��) �.�*�) �.�*�)
(�. ~ brenda . ~��)
(�.��~ (�.�* ~ (�.�*


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JANNEBARN's Photo JANNEBARN Posts: 225
2/1/13 10:53 A

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www.dietdoctor.com/seven-myths-about
-o
besity

Interesting

"We are on the outskirts of Looneyland, heading towards city center." - The Vicar of Dibley


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KICK-SS's Photo KICK-SS Posts: 9,649
1/25/13 1:34 A

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Exotec, I have to agree with Inspirational3's analysis - I've always enjoyed your reviews on the various books and things. I think we all appreciate you more than you realize!!

I do the low carb, but I allow 50 grams carbs per day - and while it's usually veggies or fruits, sometimes I splurge and have some beans, a small potato, some chips - some kind of treat. As long as I keep the amount small, it doesn't set off cravings. I don't do it often, but in my mind it helps to know that option is there if I choose to use it...

Betty

EWEFLUFFY IS NOW KICK-SS

TODAY IS THE TOMORROW YOU WORRIED ABOUT YESTERDAY. GET ON WITH IT!!

BEFORE YOU CAN START A NEW CHAPTER - YOU HAVE TO FIRST TURN THE PAGE!




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EXOTEC's Photo EXOTEC Posts: 3,327
1/24/13 7:50 P

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I agree! Low-carb isn't restrictive at all for me - at least outside of the restricted carbs, of course. I'm such a carb addict, that will always be something I need to guard against, I think. But it's very manageable for me now. If I fall to temptation, I do it with intent, not because it's in front of me and I just can't bear to turn it down.

There's so many great things you can eat in this lifestyle! I have to laugh - family and friends know I'm on a weight-reduction plan...and then they see the sorts of things I'm eating and get "that look" on their faces! LOL Lots of meat and creamy sauces and loads of butter (butter is a SAUCE!! haha), bacon, cheese...I go through eggs like crazy. I made some "Texas Chili" (nearly no beans) recently, from scratch, and it was delish. I spent a couple hours today making stuffed mushrooms, and they're so big I could only eat 2 for dinner! Yesterday's dinner was a juicy marbled ribeye with about 1/4 cup of Bearnaise sauce! mmmmm I couldn't finish that, either! And I've lost over a whole person's weight from my skeleton doing this! amazing.

Thanks for the info about the Atkins site. I haven't been there, although I should! I don't know why it never occurred to me -duh- I will now!

I've had their bars, but honestly, I like the Special K bars better. The nutrition values aren't much out of line with the Atkins guidelines. You should look into those also. I recently picked up some of their new crackers, since I like the breakfast bars, and the crackers work out to less than 1 carb each! The ones I have are potato. I don't know if they're all potato or if some have wheat (I don't think so). But they come in a couple flavors. The ones I have are just plain sea salt, and I like them. Chips and Laughing Cow cheese. nom nom


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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EXOTEC's Photo EXOTEC Posts: 3,327
1/24/13 7:38 P

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@ INSPIRATIONAL3 ~
I'm glad you're getting some use from my reviews - although I'm sorry to hear the circumstances. You might find some of the books in your local library. I saw a copy of Wheat Belly in WalMart for a reasonable price just a couple days ago!

Yes, I like the low-carb lifestyle. I don't strictly follow any particular one, but I always recommend Atkins as a go-to because it provides adequate background and good structure for newcomers. I also try to conform to paleo guidelines, insofar as I'm able. Induction on ANY low-carb plan can be challenging. Your body is going to rebel at the sudden restriction of the carb calories it's been accustomed to utilizing. Once you get past that, you'll find it's not difficult at all to comply with. And you're right: Atkins was not radical -- well, at least not in a bad way. His approach was radical compared to the SAD, and some people still consider it so. But it's a healthy lifestyle. You may hear nonsense about his diet killed him, but that's not true. He died as a result of head trauma after slipping on a patch of ice.

Anyway, thanks for the compliments, and I hope you can find some reading material to support your interest in the lifestyle. It's very worthwhile!

...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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LITHGIRL's Photo LITHGIRL Posts: 980
1/24/13 1:54 P

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If you go to Atkins.com you can sign up for their FREE "Quick Start Program" where they send you a carb counter and sample Atkin bars. I subscribe to their free e-newsletter and today they sent me 4 really great looking soup recipes, 3 of 4 which are Phase 1 compatible..
A Chili soup, chicken fennel spinach soup, creamy mushroom, and a Clam Chowder that is good for 2-4 phases.
Today I expermiented and made a stuffed pepper soup that came out great!! Low carb can be downright fun!

Joan

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INSPIRATIONAL3's Photo INSPIRATIONAL3 Posts: 2,756
1/23/13 6:59 P

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Dear Exotec,

I am so impressed at how well read you are. Also, thank you for unselfishly sharing all your findings with us. I am in a fire situation which has curtailed my reading only to necessary items right now I look forward to review some of your resource suggestions.

Do you like the Atkins diet? Many people think him very radical but if you read the whole book you will see he is not. I find the induction phase sever for me but I hot to get through it successfuly someday soon.

Thank all the rest of you for sharing your experiences and knowledge I am glad to be here on this journey with you.

2018 DIVINE PURPOSE FOUND:
TO BE THE HEALTHIEST I CAN BE EMOTIONALLY,PHYSICALLY & FINANCIALLY. THIS WILL ENABLE ME TO ACHIEVE GOALS AND HANDLE ANY ADVERSITY LIFE PRESENTS TO ME WITH DIGNITY AND GRACE AND THE ABILITY TO OVERCOME THE DEVASTATING NEGATIVE AFFECTS OF TRAUMAS IN OUR LIVES.

BY DOING THIS I WILL THEN BE THERE FOR MYSELF AND OTHERS.
CONSISTENCY IS THE KEY & LOVE OF SELF


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EXOTEC's Photo EXOTEC Posts: 3,327
1/9/13 12:48 A

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Life Without Bread How a Low-Carbohydrate Diet Can Save Your Life
Allan, C. B., PhD, and Lutz, W., MD
2000; McGraw Hill: NY/NY
240 pgs, softbound
ISBN 978-0-658-00170-3

On a scale of 1 to 5, I rate this a 3

This is a nice and sensible introduction to low-carbing. It gives good foundation of the history and metabolic points, and deals with various disease processes and syndromes the plan can assist with or alleviate.
This author converts carbohydrates into bread units (BU), which are equivalent to 12 carbs per 1 BU. I suppose this gives a lower number, or else is helpful to those who arent comfortable dealing with carbs directly (as grams). I find it a bit fiddly; Id rather just use the grams. There is a 5-page listing of various foods, along with their serving sizes and BU values, at the end of the book.
Its a good basic resource, and addresses the right issues for the lifestyle. It would be a good introduction for someone wondering about low-carbing, but it isnt truly a diet guide, since it doesnt contain a plan or menus, just general information which would apply to most any low-carb diet.
I rated it slightly lower than I usually rate books from my library because it doesnt contain as organized a plan as some of the others Ive reviewed here. A secondary notion is that its a bit older than the ones Ive been posting. Even so, the information is still accurate and worthwhile. It might be possible to find it for less expense than the more current books. I picked mine up for really cheap online somewhere (I cant remember where now). If you can find one, at least scan through it.


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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EXOTEC's Photo EXOTEC Posts: 3,327
12/30/12 1:06 A

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@ UNIQDRGNFLY ~

I'm glad you found your supplements! I'll be interested to know how you do with them.

...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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EXOTEC's Photo EXOTEC Posts: 3,327
12/30/12 1:04 A

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The Deluxe Food Lovers Companion
Herbst, S. T., and Herbst, R.
2009, Barrons Educational Series, Inc.: Hauppage, NY
794 pgs., hardbound
ISBN 978-0-7641-6241-1

On a scale of 1 to 5, I rate this a 4

This is a classic cooks bible, complete with gilt-edged pages! It is a reference arranged in encyclopedic format, with copious glossaries (20+) and cross-referenced for easy lookups. Insets include Fast Facts, Food For Thought, some quotes, and basics for various listings. Nearly every topic of interest can be found here: terms, kitchen tools and equipment, retail cuts of meat (with diagrams), and then come the glossaries.

These sections include wines, flavor affinities (herbs and spices), British-American variances in food naming, temperature charts, cheeses, cocktails and liqueurs, sauces and stocksthe list seems endless. Appendices include information on equivalents and substitutions, metric conversions, ingredient equivalents, pan size substitutions, a guide to reading food (nutrition) labels, and food additives and what theyre used for. You will find no recipes here. This is strictly a reference volume.

It is an excellent resource for cooks of any caliber. Whether youre just beginning your exploration of the culinary arts or are seeking to expand your knowledge, theres something new and useful in this fine volume for you. I recommend it highly for every kitchen.


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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CD11848595 Posts: 1,261
12/30/12 12:41 A

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@ ECoTEC: sorry, finger is sore...lol

I did a lot of research and ordered these:

Magnesium Malate Forte 120 Vegetarian Tabs #50740
A combination of malic acid with magnesium and vitamin B2 (riboflavin). All three of these nutrients are important for energy generation.* Magnesium malate is involved in the Krebs cycle, and in the activation of many enzyme systems that are important for protein and carbohydrate metabolism.*

Suggested Use: As a dietary supplement, 1 or 2 tablets two or three times daily with meals, or as directed by a healthcare practitioner.

Serving Size 2 tablets
Servings per container 60
Amount per serving:
Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) 10 mg
Magnesium (60% as Magnesium Citrate and 40% as Magnesium Hydroxide) 124 mg
Malic acid 500 mg
Other ingredients: Microcrystalline cellulose, stearic acid, croscarmellose sodium, silicon dioxide, magnesium stearate.

and...

Vitamin D3 Complete Daily Balance w/ A & K2 - 60 Fish Gelatin Caps #56380
Vitamin D3 Complete is formulated to respect the crucial importance of balancing vitamin D with vitamin A.* It also contains the other oil-soluble vitamins, K2 (menaquinone-7) and DeltaGOLD tocotrienols (part of the vitamin E family). Vitamin D3 Complete is formulated for safe, long-term daily supplementation for most individuals.*

Vitamin D3 Complete is preservative-free and chemical-free, in a natural base of palm oil, and is encapsulated in state-of-the-art fish gelatin capsules.

Suggested Use: As a dietary supplement, 1 capsule one or two times daily, or as directed by a healthcare practitioner.

Serving Size 1 capsule
Servings per container 60
Amount per serving:
Vitamin D3 (as Cholecalciferol) 2000 IU
Vitamin A (as Retinyl Palmitate) 3000 IU
Vitamin K2 (as Menaquinone-7) 100 g
Tocotrienols (as DeltaGOLD Tocotrienols) 5 mg
Other ingredients: Fish gelatin, palm oil, silicon dioxide, ascorbyl palmitate, d-Alpha-tocopherol, rosemary essential oil.

I will try them and see...got them both on Amazon at a very reasonable price.

Thank you so much for your help! emoticon

EXOTEC's Photo EXOTEC Posts: 3,327
12/30/12 12:21 A

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RATIO: The Simple Code Behind the Craft of Everyday Cooking
Ruhlman, M.
2009, Scribner: NY, NY
244 pgs., softbound
ISBN 978-1-4165-7172-8

On a scale of 1 to 5, I rate this a 4

What an amazing and essential little guidebook for any culinarians library! These basic ratios will provide you a solid foundation upon which to build your cooking arts. The category list is short, but contains all the necessary information to make great, dependable, and reproducible recipes. This short list covers doughs and batters, stocks, meats (processed, such as sausages), fat-based sauces, and custards.

A testimonial from Alton Brown of the FoodNetwork should give you some insight into the sort of information you will find in this book. The author, trained at the Culinary Institute of America, gives not only the ratios for each category, but background into the technique and science of why it works. You are then freed to create your own masterpieces from these foundations, whether something completely your own or simply modifications of recipes youve collected. Its a marvelous resource for expanding or reducing recipe yields without sacrificing the quality of the original.

Recipes dont overwhelm the text; most are variations and adornments to the basic category theyre in. Mayonnaise with additions. Vinaigrettes. Cream sauces. Variations on doughs for sweet, savory, or pasta dishes. Brining. It reminds me of a series of childrens books: the Big Little Books, because although its not large or unwieldy, the information in it could easily fill a typical encyclopedic volume of the sort many professional kitchens keep in their libraries.

I searched for simple basic information such as this for a long time. I am so happy to have found this one! I know of no other of its type. My only excuse for rating this less than 5 is that it isnt a diet book, but rather a corollary or supporting read. I strongly encourage anyone with a love or desire for cooking to pick one up. You wont regret it.


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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EXOTEC's Photo EXOTEC Posts: 3,327
12/29/12 10:47 P

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@ UNIQDRGNFLY~

I get most of my supplements through a mailorder company called VitaCost.
www.vitacost.com/vitaminsandsuppleme
nt
s

I've had to get my Mg malate separately, since most Mg supplements are other forms. Upon inspection, it looks like I'm taking all 3 of those individually. (I track all my meds and supplements in my Nutrition Tracker -- you're welcome to peruse, it's shared).Part of that is because most of the combination forms don't contain enough D3 to satisfy our endocrinologist's prescription (he's got me on 20000 IU now).
Anyway, check out the VitaCost site. They're pretty good about listing all the ingredients in their products, and carry other name brands than just their own.

Edited by: EXOTEC at: 12/29/2012 (22:49)
...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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EXOTEC's Photo EXOTEC Posts: 3,327
12/29/12 10:16 P

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PDR for Nutritional Supplements (2nd ed.)
Hendler, S. S., PhD, MD, FACP, FACN , FAIC, with Rornik, D., M., MS
2008, PDR, Inc.: Montvale, NJ
788 pgs., hardbound
ISBN 978-1-56363-710-0

On a scale of 1 to 5, I rate this a 4

Physicians Desk References are standards in the healthcare community. For anyone with a background in the field, this reference will be familiar. For those not already acquainted with these guides, you will find extensive information of both technical and practical nature.

The book is organized in a cross-referenced manner. It opens with a description of how to use its contents, then goes directly into a series of indices: by product name, by category (type), by indications (complaint or symptom), side effects, interactions, and companion (complementary) drugs. These listings are then followed by detailed descriptions of each product in alphanumeric sequence. Some examples of the types of entries you can find here include vitamins and minerals, fish oil, DHA, amino acids, and probiotics. Every entry has an overall description, its actions (pharmacology), indications for use with typical dosages, contraindications, precautions, and adverse reactions, interactions, overdosage, dosage and administration, and pertinent literature (including research). Several tables follow the body of individual entries, listing analyses of many combination products (some name brands).

This books format is geared toward medical professionals. If youre looking simply for a guideline of recommendations for general nutrition and health, it may be more than you want although you can certainly skim through the parts which dont concern you and cut to the chase. The text is written for data, not especially for reading interest if youre not on a seek-and-find mission. It is a wealth of information for that purpose. Keeping in mind that its orientation is toward the healthcare community, some of the nutritional myths and suggestions are still supported; you should be prepared to filter its research through what we currently know about nutrition, especially in light of whatever form of diet or lifestyle you embrace. That being said, I find no deficiency in its content. I encourage anyone interested in purchasing a copy to pick one up in a bookstore and page through it to be sure its what youre looking for: its a hefty volume and the price tag will reflect it. Be sure it fits your needs.


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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EXOTEC's Photo EXOTEC Posts: 3,327
12/29/12 10:16 P

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PDR for Herbal Medicines (4th ed.)
2007, Thomson Healthcare, Inc.: Montvale, NJ
1026 pgs., hardbound
ISBN 1-56363-978-6

On a scale of 1 to 5, I rate this a 4

This volume is another which will be familiar to anyone in the healthcare field. Its excellent information is accessible to non-medical sorts.

From the Contents page:
How to Use This Book; Alphabetical index; Therapeutic Category index; Indications index; Homeopathic Indications index; Asian Indications index; Side Effects index; Drug/Herb Interactions index; Safety guide; Common Herbal Terminology; Herb Identification Guide (color photo plates); Herbal Monographs; Nutritional Supplement Monographs.

Each entry (monograph) is arranged alphabetically in the body of the text. The common and scientific names are given, followed by its medicinal part(s), claimed effects, actions and pharmacology, dosage and administration, interactions, side effects, precautions, and discussion of any clinical trials (noting whether the effects are supported by these trials or are not). Reference literature is grouped at the end of each entry. There is a section for some of the most recognized nutritional supplements, although not so extensive as can be found in the sister volume, PDR for Nutritional Supplements.

As with the PDR for Nutritional Supplements, this book makes no recommendations; it simply lists the data for each item. It is a very balanced and thorough treatment of the herbs, which will go a long way for those who have an idea of what they want or what issues theyre trying to address.

I encourage anyone interested in acquiring a copy of either of these PDRs to find one in a bookstore or library that you can peruse. Even if its not the most current edition, the arrangement will be the same. The format may be just what youre looking for, or it may be too detailed for your use. I find it an invaluable resource, but Im a science nut, so I may be biased!


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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EXOTEC's Photo EXOTEC Posts: 3,327
12/29/12 10:13 P

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Mosbys Handbook of Herbs & Natural Supplements (4th ed.)
Skidmore-Roth, L., RN, MSN, NP
2010; Mosby Elsevier: St. Louis, MO
746 pgs., softbound
ISBN 978-0-323-05741-7

On a scale of 1 to 5, I rate this a 4

What a great resource this is! Great information and a handy size: its reminiscent of a field guide, about 4 x 7 x 1. Mosby-Elsevier is another respected publisher in healthcare, and this book lives up to their reputation of providing accurate and unbiased information. Its readability is excellent.

Each entrys monograph, arranged alphabetically, includes the common name, the scientific name, and other names it might be called. Then the origin of the plant and its uses are covered. Details include actions, availability, dosage and administration (for various lifestages pregnancy, lactation, children), contraindications, side effects or adverse reactions, interactions, pharmacology, client considerations (what youd tell someone if recommending the herb), and icons to highlight special information. A nice notation is the effects each herb might have upon laboratory test results. A brief discussion of relevant clinical trials objectively indicates whether claims of effectiveness were supported or not, or whether further testing is needed.

Useful appendices include resources to obtain herbs, herb-and-drug interactions, pediatric use, and abbreviations used in the text. There is a good index.

I use this book frequently. I havent looked yet (but intend to!) to see if a similar volume for nutritional supplements is available. I expect that to be so. I recommend anyone contemplating using herbal supplements in their diet to examine this book. Its a very good one.


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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CD11848595 Posts: 1,261
12/29/12 4:23 P

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@MISSCUS...I don't watch Oz much either, but just happened to catch that particular show too! So glad I did! It changed my life! So proud for your accomplishments too!

@ EXOTEC...and others...The particular supplement I am searching for is Vit D3 with K2, Magnesium Malate..if there is such a thing together, may have to take two separate ones.

Edited by: CD11848595 at: 12/29/2012 (16:24)
CD8022584 Posts: 4,515
12/29/12 4:16 P

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EXOTEC, some interesting books you reviewed. I may have to find a couple to add to my library.

I have had major digestive troubles and disruptive to daily life, digestive problems which kept me near a restroom for my whole life. After removing wheat, I have not had any of these problems. I cannot thank Dr Davis enough for his writing efforts and my accidently seeing him on Dr Oz, who I don't often watch. I'm so glad I did. 2013 will be a comfortable year for me. YAY

I am also thankful for our Wheat Belly team and all the information I find here. YAY again!

EXOTEC's Photo EXOTEC Posts: 3,327
12/29/12 3:41 P

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I love that Paperback Swap - I'm a member, although I haven't actually done any exchanges yet. That's upcoming!

Funny you should mention the supplements -- I have one good book I've just finished (and yet to post), and a couple more in the works. Keep an eye out, they'll be here ASAP!

...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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CD11848595 Posts: 1,261
12/29/12 3:31 P

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@Exotec ~ I enjoy your book reviews so keep posting!

I am in the process of trying to find some supplements that are wheat/gluten/grain/sugar free, so if you have any links/books/articles/web sites for this, I would greatly appreciate it and if I find any, will post under heading. emoticon

CD11848595 Posts: 1,261
12/29/12 3:17 P

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Speaking of books, I cleaned out my library using Paperback Swap. I think it is only for the US, but I got rid of a lot of books that no longer applied to my life and was able to get credits to get books that currently do.

www.paperbackswap.com/index.php

JANNEBARN's Photo JANNEBARN Posts: 225
12/28/12 1:24 P

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I have borrowed "Fat" from the library a couple of times, and may have to buy it!

My current favourite book is "Nourishing Traditions" by Sally Fallon. (I just skip through the more grainy sections LOL!)

Can anyone recommend a book on fermenting vegetables? I have read "Wild Fermentation" but would like to peruse a few more before I purchase one to keep.

"We are on the outskirts of Looneyland, heading towards city center." - The Vicar of Dibley


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EXOTEC's Photo EXOTEC Posts: 3,327
12/28/12 12:59 P

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Fat: An Appreciation of a Misunderstood Ingredient, with Recipes
McLagan, J.
2008, Ten Speed Press: NY
232 pgs., hardbound
On a scale of 1 to 5, I rate this a 3

This is a very nice book for a favorite ingredient! It is truly a paean to fat in all its glory. It opens with a general discussion of fat and a dismissal of myths surrounding it, although it isnt a technical detailing such as you would find in low-carb, primal/paleo, or other specialty diet references. It does, however, contain good information on our current understanding of fat (current to the date of publication, naturally).

The body of the book is arranged by type of fat: butter, pork fat, poultry fat, and other tallows (beef and lamb). Every page is sprinkled with interesting little commentaries, whether they be quotes or some expanded concepts or simply commonly heard sayings or phrases about fat. A few recipes are included in each section which use that particular fat. They all look delicious! Plenty of foodie type photographs embellish the text.

My reason for rating this a 3 is that it is very focused in its scope. For anyone who loves to collect specialty food books, this will be a welcome addition to their library. Others may prefer to peruse it in a public library (if it can be found) or bookstore. I like it a lot, and I intend to keep mine near to hand!


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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NAMP Meat Buyers Guide
2007, John Wiley and Sons, Inc.: Hoboken, NJ
298 pages, plastic / spiral bound
ISBN 978-0-471-74721-5
On a scale of 1 to 5, I rate this a 4

This is the official foodservice reference. My copy is an older one; I have the impression that it is produced annually or at least periodically. Other editions will contain the currently accepted information for the year theyre copyrighted in.

The book is replete with copious and excellent photographs of meat for primal cuts, portion cuts, and examples of marbling (grading). This information is the official USDA standard for all meatcutters. It appears to be a resource text for students in the field as well. There are guidelines for food safety, bacterial growth and control, definitions of butchers terms, trim levels, a glossary, and several pages of USDA-approved nutrition information listed by the NAMP number for the cut and its common name. The main body of the book is arranged by animal type and includes primal cuts, skeletal charts, and portion weights. There is a special explanation of the numbering system applied to poultry, and a section (including good pictures) of cured meats, along with a definition of terms for these products. A much-appreciated glossary precedes the index, both of which contain the ID (NAMP) number and common name.
This is not a pocket guide. Its a full size book, if not slightly larger, and comes with tabbed dividers to enable quick look-ups. I find it very useful for its marvelous and detailed photographs and clear definitions. As with the other review Ive posted recently on meat, this is not a diet guide nor a recipe book. It is pure reference. Well worthwhile for its intent. Whatever copy or edition you may find will serve you well, while keeping in mind that any changes in nomenclature or cutting will be reflected; but these differences are more pertinent to those in the foodservice industry than they are to those of us in receipt of their products. For us, this is a welcome clarifying resource.


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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12/28/12 12:58 P

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Field Guide to Meat
Aliza Green
2005, Quirk Books: Philadelphia, PA
311 pgs., softbound
ISBN 978-1-59474-017-6
On a scale of 1 to 5, I rate this a 4

This handy volume lives up to its subtitle, How to Identify, Select, and Prepare Virtually Every Meat, Poultry, and Game Cut. When the author says every, she really means it right down to alligator, rattlesnake, opossum, and more typical game meats. The bulk of the book covers typical meats, such as beef, pork, lamb, and poultry, and processed or cured forms. The format is one which will be familiar to anyone who has used field guides: its dimensions are 6 x 4.5 x 1, making it a nice size to carry along to butcheries or custom cutters, or even to refer to in unfamiliar groceries. Ive found it helps me speak to butchers (especially non-professionals who simply happen to work in the meat departments) who arent quite clear on specifications I request.

Chapters are arranged by animal, and then by cut. Each entry includes the official NAMP cut number and its common name. A short overview, perhaps a couple of pages, opens each section, and is followed in each case by the most recognized name for the cut, other names you might encounter for it, a general description, the part of the animal it comes from, its characteristics, how to choose the cut, the amount to buy per person or serving, how to store it, how to prepare it (in general this isnt a recipe book), and its flavor affinities. There is a large section of excellent color plates (photos) in the center of the book, along with roasting (temperature) charts. A diagram of primal cuts precedes the main body of the text. Closing information includes sources and a nice index.

This book wont direct you in what to eat, how to cook, or provide any structure to a particular diet of any sort (other than its not vegetarian or vegan!). It will define and clarify pretty much any aspect of meat that you would otherwise care or need to know. Very much worth a look.


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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12/28/12 12:58 P

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@ JANNeBARN ~
I hope you have good results in collecting some books into your library! I'm all for spreading the word, and these books will help to accomplish that... I hope!
I'm sorry I can't tell you much about blepharitis, other than what you've already said. You might search Google Scholar (which has generally more scientific info).

Meanwhile...
I have a few books here Im going to review and post; these are not diet books. They do relate to nutrition for corollary or supplemental information, and I find them useful.

If this sort of thing appeals to the rest of you, please let me know (one way or the other) so that I have an idea whether to continue in this vein or not!

You all know that Im not the only one permitted to post reviews, doncha? LOL


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


 current weight: 231.0 
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JANNEBARN's Photo JANNEBARN Posts: 225
12/27/12 7:18 P

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Exotec, thank you for these reviews. I will be asking my library to bring in some of these titles (that is if I don't succumb to my cookbook-nutrition-addiction and just buy them!)

I have found that since I upped my intake of coconut oil I seem to be slimming even more. I made the (deliberate) mistake of eating whole rye bread 2 days in a row - EEEK, stomach cramps or what! Just like last Christmas, sigh (I am Danish and open face rye bread sandwiches with liver pate - irresistible).

I am very suddenly battling an annoying condition called blepharitis which is inflammation of the eye lid. It's also causing weird breakouts on my face. If anyone has any links to what might be the cause of such a thing in an otherwise healthy person I would be grateful.

"We are on the outskirts of Looneyland, heading towards city center." - The Vicar of Dibley


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12/27/12 6:32 P

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Eat Fat Lose Fat
Enig, M., PhD, and Fallon, S.
2005: PLUME (Penguin Group), NY / Ny
295 pgs., softbound
ISBN 978-0-452-28566-8

On a scale of 1-5, I rate this a 4

This is a nicely balanced book containing excellent first-hand background into our present nutritional fiasco, followed by recipes and menu guides for three goals readers might choose.
The authors credentials are highly respected: Dr Enig is a researcher in nutritional science (25+ years), and is published in peer reviewed journals such as Clinical Nutrition and The Journal of the American College of Nutrition. She co-authored Nourishing Traditions (hopefully Ive reviewed and posted this here somewhere!) with Sally Fallon, who is founder and president of the Weston A. Price Foundation. Both are sought-after lecturers in nutritional circles.

Eat Fat Lose Fat is another tool in the workbox for low-carb and whole food diets. The difference in this case is that Mary Enig has first-hand experience with those who overlooked or disregarded appropriate research in the development of our Standard American Diet, and can speak to those issues from a personal standpoint. Some of the detail may be startling to youor, perhaps not. In the course of this book, strong support and recommendation is given to the healing and healthful benefits of coconut oil (most of the recipes contain this ingredient). Sidebars give additional detail to special topics, and case studies illustrate points. Sally Fallon references the Weston A. Price Foundation for its significant contribution to healthy nutrition, and quotes or paraphrases many of his pioneering observations which are as true today as they were in his journeys. Truths are exchanged for myths and sensible guidelines offered for more healthful living. Sources and resources for products mentioned in the recipes or text are in an appendix preceding a nice index.

I love the open dialogue of how we were raised to this nutritional apex. Most current dietary books can describe to you that it has happened, and the errors in its development, but this is the first instance I have encountered in which the details were actually laid out plainly by someone who was there.

I like the recipes and the practical guidelines offered to those who are trying to lose weight, trying to recover health already in peril, or for those just trying to adopt a healthier lifestyle. Each aspect has sample menus, planners, and shopping lists. In terms of scientific background, this book is less extensive than others Ive reviewed recently; but this will be a welcome change to those not so heavily dependent upon research (which is not to say there isnt any sound base for the information presented! one of the authors is a researcher, after all). I think its a solid candidate for your personal library.


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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Primal Body / Primal Mind
Gedgaudas, N. T., CNS, CNT
2011, Healing Arts Press: Rochester, VT
391 pgs., softbound
ISBN 978-1-59477-413-3

On a scale of 1 to 5, I rate this a 4

I love this book at least as much for its historical and scientific aspects as for its practical and intelligent discussion of how we, as a species, have survived and thrived in the face of many challenges (ancient and modern). The author describes errors in nutritional research and how those flaws have contributed, if not caused, most of our so-called diseases of civilization. Favored hypotheses and poor research is exposed in light of current truths. Myths and derailments are described in sensible and non-inflammatory language; if the realities of how weve been duped inflame you its just the facts!

Most, if not all, of the controversial and new nutritional data are addressed here: fats, fatty acids, cholesterol, nutrient assimilation, immune response in the gut, the dangers of soy, gluten, hormonal regulation, adrenal exhaustion, and food allergies and sensitivities, all delivered with good graphic illustrations (charts, tables, pictures). A short discussion of supplementation is included. She offers a simple list of things you can do to adopt the principles outlined in this text into your dietary plan.

I found the appendices of great value, science geek that I am! She gives websites and brief descriptions for organizations and laboratories (nutritional testing!), sources for products and foods, other related websites related to a real food diet and some of the diseases and syndrome support groups, and 34 pages of recommended additional reading grouped by topic books, articles, and research. The bibliography / reference section contains sources she used in producing this book.

This is a frequent go-to resource for me, both for my own information and in response to others who would argue points of the Standard American Diet without sufficient foundation. The scientific basis appeals to me, but dont think this is simply a scientific text. Its a very readable volume for anyone interested in nutrition, how we got here, and where we can go from here, with accurate information in our arsenal. Highly recommended for personal libraries!


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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Wheat Belly
William Davis, MD
2011, Rodale: NY/NY
292 pgs, hardbound
ISBN 973-1-60961-154-5

On a scale of 1 to 5, I rate this a 4

Dr. Davis is a cardiologist who has drawn from his years in practice to expose the detrimental effects of wheat in our diets. In a nicely conversational style he explains the differences between what we (mentally) recognize as wheat and the wheat our ancestors probably ate. Discussions are amply technical, yet not overwhelming. He addresses the effects of wheat upon various systems and functions not only for those with gluten sensitivity, but also celiac sufferers, IBD, wheats effects upon pH, aging, insulin resistance (and other hormonal disruptions), and skin health. Theres a good explanation of cholesterol for those (like me) who still find themselves in a bit of a fog regarding HDL, LDL, and particle size.

There are many sidebars containing case studies, special points, and a few charts and graphs. References are grouped at the end of the book by chapter numbers, and there is an index. A brief weeks menu is listed, followed by 28 pages of recipes to assist you in adopting a wheat-free diet. There are several pages of products where you might be surprised to find wheat lurking. Practical appendices include commercial sources and resources and further reading suggestions.

I believe this book may be a godsend and lifesaver for those who have struggled with wheat/gluten sensitivity all their lives, and for those who are similarly affected but dont show digestive symptoms of it yet are nevertheless affected in its other forms. Since wheat is a form of carbohydrate (albeit given its unique and distinct differences), the concepts presented here will be welcome reference for anyone on a low-carb, whole-food dietary plan. The fact that most libraries have a waiting list for it should give testimony to its value. I recommend it highly.


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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Dietary Supplements and Functional Foods (2nd ed.)
Webb, G. P.
2011 Blackwell Publishing: West Sussex, UK
316 pages, softbound
ISBN 978-1-4443-3240-7

On a scale of 1 to 5, I rate this a 3

The rating for this text suffers only insofar that it isnt a diet book. It is a valuable correlative and supportive volume for anyone wanting better understanding of the many other foods which impact our macro diets.

The author is a senior lecturer at the University of East Londons School of Health and Bioscience, and his abilities in this genre are evident throughout the book. It accomplishes the authors goal of giving order and structure to its topic. As a lecturer by profession, he has arranged the book as if it were a syllabus for undergrads. As added value, at least as far as Im concerned, this second edition is very up-to-date (2011), and thus contains current material. It is a scientific (read: technical) discourse on the subject. You must decide for yourself whether deeper understanding of the science or a lighter coverage of basic principles are most appealing and useful to you.

The first chapter is an overview of supplements and functional foods, including the rationales for their use. He addresses current/common thought as well as the scientific basis, citing reports when applicable. Comparisons are offered between the UK and the American standards and recommendations. Legal issues and health claims, quality of products available, and a vital section on how we can assess the validity of different types of investigational studies are included. This sets the stage for a thorough discussion of different classes of supplements, which follows.

Micronutrients, vitamins, minerals, free radicals, antioxidants, fats, and some of the most-recognized nonessential supplements are each dealt with in depth and individually. A section is devoted to natural herbal supplements which are common across many nutritional platforms. Some descriptions include graphics of chemical structure, the nature and actions of each entry, and differences for use between subgroups (children, adults, lactating or pregnant women, the elderly). In most cases, recommended daily values accompany each entry, both from the UK and American standpoints. Most chapters conclude with a summary.

I find this book a fine reference to which I return frequently. It should not be mistaken as light reading, because although it is a good read (meaning readable and not overwhelming to those not immersed in nutritional science), it certainly wont be a book youll curl up with on a slow afternoon. You will find very valuable answers and explanations for the whys and wherefores of nearly any supplement and nutritional remedy. I reserve nothing in my recommendation of its content for those with a scientific drift.


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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12/11/12 3:19 P

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@UNIQDRGNFLY ~
thanks for posting that website! I lingered there for quite a while. Found a couple other articles people might like:
drbradshook.com/2011/08/why-cant-i-
los
e-weight/

and...
drbradshook.com/2011/11/food-allergi
es
-can-prevent-weight-loss/


BTW: love your website! =D

@JANNEBARN ~
I'm not a big fan of ChefMeg, either. I'd like to be, I guess... but there are very rare recipes applicable to this or low-carb lifestyles. They're willing to publish vegetarian or vegan things. How about the rest of us?!? lol

...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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12/11/12 11:02 A

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I am a self-proclaimed cookbook addict so I welcome any and all reviews of them here! (Well. Anything but SP's Chef Meg who I equate with the cheap recipes you get in supermarket checkout magazines.)

I LOVE the Nourishing Traditions book.

"We are on the outskirts of Looneyland, heading towards city center." - The Vicar of Dibley


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CD11848595 Posts: 1,261
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So we are told all our lives to have "will power" emoticon ....Here is a great article on Leptin, the hormone.

The brain, our motherboard...lol.

drbradshook.com/2012/11/are-you-alwa
ys
-hungry-you-could-have-leptin-resistR>ance/


www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/25
14
29.php


Edited by: CD11848595 at: 12/11/2012 (07:13)
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Cooking With Coconut Flour
Fife, Bruce, ND
2005 Piccadilly Books, Ltd., Colorado Springs CO
160 pages, softbound
ISBN 978-0941599-63-4

On a scale of 1 to 5, I rate this a 3

This is a great little book for those desperately seeking an alternative to typical flours. These recipes are developed for, not adapted for, coconut flour. The author describes his difficulties in attempting other published recipes all of which contained at least some amount of regular (or even alternate) flours. Because none of them produced the desired result, he embarked on his own discovery mission.

Each of the recipes in this little volume is free of: wheat, gluten, soy, trans fats, artificial sweeteners, and yeast. Most have sugar-free or low-carb versions. The most valuable information in this book though is the tips and techniques for the unique properties of coconut flour, and how to create a final product that you dont have to convince yourself (or others!) of. I cant wait to try them out.

I dont plan to make recipe books a regular offering in these reviews. Occasionally I happen across something like this which I believe to be especially useful to those of us in a wheat-free or low carb lifestyle, and so may occasionally post other things of this nature. So far as the rating I gave this, it rates the middle-road only because it isnt a diet or nutrition guide.

I would be interested to know if others on this forum either do or dont want reviews on topics such as this one and the previous one. I have several other general books on nutrition and foods which I will review and post if you want them.


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats (revised 2nd ed.).
Fallon, S., with Enig, M. G., PhD
2001 New Trends Publishing, Inc., Washington DC
676 pages, softbound
ISBN 0-96708973-5

On a scale of 1 to 5, I rate this a 4

This book provides a very nice combination of information and practical use. I dont plan to make recipe collections or cookbooks a typical part of my reviews, but this one is more than that, and for that reason I include it here.

The introduction of about 70 pages covers the politics and development of the Standard American Diet. The author doesnt pull any punches; her insight will open doors for anyone reluctant to let go of the healthy nutritional information weve been fed. Also in this section you will find discussions of macronutrients, micronutrients (vitamins, minerals), enzymes, spices, special diets, and more practical tips on food selection, equipment, and hints for cooking.

Thereafter, the book consists of a collection of nice recipes that wont require a chefs certificate to accomplish. They all look tasty, and the processes are clearly described. Each section is divided by category, beginning with a short page or so of concepts and hints specific to each.

The interesting part for me is that every page is filled with sidebar information. Some is from research, some from observation, some from chefs, there are Know Your Ingredient lists which encourage you to guess what the final product might be (with answers in the index), and pertinent facts to enhance your understanding of nutrition and our history surrounding it. Some suggested sample menus are included as well.

There are two indices: one a subject index, and the other a recipe index. I found this a nice feature, since you dont have to wade through a lot of irrelevant listings if youre searching for one thing or another. A short page of conversions is included.

The author promotes the Weston A. Price Foundation, with good cause, and many sidebar notations include observations from his studies. A descriptive page and mail-in cards to the Foundation are at the end of the book.

For anyone attempting to gently introduce friends or family to a healthier lifestyle, this would make a wonderful Christmas present. They will have a nice cookbook, and might be tempted to peruse the meat of information surrounding our current nutritional crisis while theyre preparing the recipes. Its worth a look, if you can find it. Im glad to have my copy, and even if your gift is to yourself, I think it will be well received!


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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12/9/12 4:09 P

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Great video

CD12459382 Posts: 1,856
10/26/12 3:11 A

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Saw this video by Mark Hyman today. It could serve as a good summary / introduction of the problems with wheat / gluten to mention to friends / relatives. It takes about seven minutes.

www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player
_e
mbedded&v=yLJSmJ0bMlk#!


Edited by: CD12459382 at: 10/26/2012 (03:12)
JANNEBARN's Photo JANNEBARN Posts: 225
8/1/12 1:21 P

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www.marksdailyapple.com/when-listeni
ng
-to-your-body-doesnt-work/#axzz22JZGR>lQzQ

Just read this interesting article!

"We are on the outskirts of Looneyland, heading towards city center." - The Vicar of Dibley


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7/30/12 10:36 A

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whole9life.com/2012/01/whole-30-v201
2/


I just found this resource for someone wanting to give Paleo at 30 trial run.

"We are on the outskirts of Looneyland, heading towards city center." - The Vicar of Dibley


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7/21/12 12:52 P

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Thanks for the link. Hope you don't mind I make it an active link for those who are not good with the computer or very short on time. emoticon glutenfreeeasily.com/about/

Birgit

BE THE CHANGE YOU WANT TO SEE IN OTHERS.

http://whippetsandducks.weebly.com/




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Check out this site:

http://glutenfreeeasily.com/about/


"We are on the outskirts of Looneyland, heading towards city center." - The Vicar of Dibley


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Thanks for sharing.
www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/09/12/ev
er
ything-in-moderation_n_953804.html


Birgit emoticon

Edited by: HOUNDLOVER1 at: 7/10/2012 (10:51)
BE THE CHANGE YOU WANT TO SEE IN OTHERS.

http://whippetsandducks.weebly.com/




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7/10/12 10:17 A

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I just found this article which may be of interest, on the subject of "moderation" (my apologies if I should post it elsewhere, feel free to share):

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/09/12
/everything-in-moderation_n_953804.html


"We are on the outskirts of Looneyland, heading towards city center." - The Vicar of Dibley


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The Vegetarian Myth - Lierre Keith
Not just about nutrition, although there is a lot of well researched information on diet, and the authors personal experience.

The author also does a great job bringing reality and statistics to a global sustainability conversation and how are collective diets and buying patterns impact that.

I found it had a huge impact on me.

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emoticon emoticon emoticon
This is what we needed here. I don't have anything to add at the moment but hopefully will in the future. emoticon

Birgit

BE THE CHANGE YOU WANT TO SEE IN OTHERS.

http://whippetsandducks.weebly.com/




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Trick and Treat: How Healthy Eating Is Making Us Ill
Barry Groves
pub. Hammersmith Press Ltd., London, GB
2008
498 pgs., paperbound
ISBN 978-1-905140-22-0

On a scale of 1 - 5, I rate this a 4

This is a nice reference along the lines of "Why We Get Fat", with the added perspective of similar issues in Britain and around the world. The author, an honorary board member of the Weston A Price Foundation, maintains three healthcare websites and has several other books in publication.

The book develops the history and fallacies of nutritional science in much the same manner as the Taubes book, and I found the additional information on official and commercial influences in Britain valuable. It raises both the same as well as different issues relative to its topic.

This is not a diet book; you will not find a plan or menus here. It has very good information on how we came to be in our present dietary dilemma, educational details on how nutritional metabolism works, and backs up its statements with references to research (including some charts). It debunks many dearly held notions still in "current wisdom".

There is an extensive reference section organized by chapter, a nice index, a short page of other reference resources, and a glossary of acronyms. Overall, it's another eye-opening look into nutritional science. I enjoyed it, and think others devoted to promotion of true dietary health will find it a reliably welcome resource.


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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The Complete Guide to Vitamins, Herbs, and Supplements
Conkling, Winifred
pub. Avon Books, NY/NY
2006
321 pgs., paperbound
ISBN 978-0-06-076066-3

On a scale of 1 - 5, I rate this a 2

This is a useful book. Its several sections are organized around Vitamins and Minerals, Herbs, Nutritional Supplements, Homeopathic Remedies, Shopping for Supplements, and a listing of supplements suggested for a variety of ailments.

Each supplement entry includes what it is and how the body uses it, food sources, signs of deficiency, dosage information, and possible side effects and interactions. The recommendations are based upon official RDAs and Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) extant at the date of publication, which may not correspond with low-carb or primal/paleo recommendations.

On the same note, the book lacks newer information on some supplements; for example, cinnamon is not mentioned in the section for diabetes (or elsewhere in the book). Some information has been supplanted by more current research, such as the promotion of fiber in the diet to enhance mucus production in the gut, but fiber is now thought to contribute to "leaky gut syndrome" by further damaging intestinal surfaces. Most information contained is good insofar as the physiologic basis for supplements, but I would not call it "Complete" or the most up-to-date in today's nutritional environment. There is no index, which is a detraction for me, as I use indices often in reference reading.

Still, it is a useful book, but the reader must evaluate it critically. Newer texts on the topic might be a better choice for those who don't already have a general sense of supplements or current recommendations.


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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Good Calories, Bad Calories
Gary Taubes
pub. Anchor Books, NY
2008
611 pgs., paperbound
ISBN 978-1-4000-3346-1

On a scale of 1 - 5, I rate this a 3

Gary Taubes, also author of "Why We Get Fat", is an able and conscientious (award-winning) science journalist. In this book, he sets about to carry us through the erratic and misleading development of our current nutritional myths.

He accomplishes this in fine manner, showing how social and political pressures have distorted true science. He takes issues in point from the cholesterol hypothesis, which is still presently promoted as a leading cause of heart disease, the diversion of scientific focus away from carbohydrates in the development of diabetes and other attributable maladies, and the overall climate surrounding obesity and health in the social and political arenas.

Along the way, he shows how alternate and still-promulgated viewpoints have been accepted as "research", and describes the error in those studies by giving us good examples of what truly unbiased research *should* be. While describing these developments, he delves into some of the science and medical foundation for the points he makes - although you should not expect this to be a medical resource, as such. This is purest meta-analytical research at its best, from one of the best journalists to deliver it.

I find it an invaluable resource in conversations with those who throw down the gauntlet of "common wisdom" relative to diet and nutrition, who invariably use these biased or otherwise not-supported hypotheses in their argument.

It's an eye-opening view into how our experts have come to the conclusions they have, and a warning against blind acceptance of "facts" evidenced to allay any suspicions we may have.

This will probably not be useful, initially, to newcomers to low-carb living, unless they (like myself) need to know all the background and development in making their choice to adopt or not. I believe it to be a great resource for those of us firmly planted in the lifestyle, and who are challenged by nay-sayers in its safety and success. I am glad to have it in my library.


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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Living Low Carb (rev. ed.)
Bowden, Jonny, PhD, CNS
pub. Sterling, NY/NY
2010
416 p., paperbound
ISBN 978-1-4027-6825-5

On a scale of 1 - 5, I rate this a 5.

This is probably one of the most amazing books on low-carb I've had the pleasure to review. It is a veritable fountain of information for anyone new to the idea and researching options, as well as a wealth of good background for those already in the lifestyle.

The author is a respected nutritionist and author of several books, associated with several well-known publications (Forbes, Wall Street Journal, GQ), and speaks at nutritional educational conferences. The book is endorsed in the foreword by Barry Sears, author of The Zone diet.

The hands-down best feature of the book, IMO, is its review of 38 low-carb diets. Each one is described in general but thorough terms, and is followed by a commentary by the author. Each one summarizes "who it works for and who should look elsewhere" - a most valuable consideration for anyone trying to make a choice of which plan to follow amidst the many plans available. But the wonders don't end there!

A short history of low-carbing opens the book. Then follows basic topics of interest and focus, such as insulin resistance, leptin, fats, ketosis, effectiveness of a low-carb diet in managing "the usual culprits" of modern ailments, cholesterol, low-glycemic index, mythbusting, and some handy charts and tables (not overly burdensome) to round out key concepts. There is a good section on diet drugs and nutritional supplements. A fairly extensive "FAQ" which covers many questions and concerns I've seen posed here on SP and on other low-carb websites. A great section covers tips to making low-carb "work" for you and how to create your own program based upon general low-carbing guidelines. Another segment covers resources for low-carbers: websites and blogs, calculations tools, recommended reading (including cookbooks), and the author's own "Low-Carb Life Pyramid", which includes not only foods but behaviours as well. The endnote bibliography is arranged by chapter, which makes it easy to reference topics brought up in the discussion. A nice index - which is always a boon to me - concludes the text.

In short, I can't recommend the book highly enough; if anyone reading this post doesn't run right out and find one for themselves, I just wouldn't understand it! Even if all you do is pick one up to peruse (but bring your wallet!).


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living
Volek, Jeff S., PhD, RD & Phinney, Stephen D., MD, PhD
pub. Beyond Obesity, LLC; Lexington, KY
2011
302 pgs, paperbound
ISBN 978-0-9834907-0-8

On a scale of 1 - 5, I rate this a 4

This book is written by the co-authors of "The New Atkins For A New You" (also reviewed in this thread). In their own words, "The readership of this book is not necessarily limited to healthcare professionals. Anyone with serious curiosity about nutrition and metabolism, or a desire to understand how traditional food practices can be used to improve health, will likely enjoy this book." (Volek & Phinney, 2011, p. vi) The focus is, as the title indicates, the science behind a low-carb diet. It is not a diet plan, nor is it specifically attuned to Atkins, although there are many references and examples geared toward that lifestyle.

It gives much greater depth on the science of why low-carb diets work, and debunks many of the myths and misinformation still in circulation today about the nutritional values or dangers of low-carb living. Specific references to various disease processes and maladies are noted. Case studies and "clinical pearls" will appeal to those with a background in or simply a desire for more nutritional science.

A sample menu plan (illustrative, not comprehensive) is included, along with a handful of recipes. A reasonable reference list and index facilitate further study, if desired - but the book covers most aspects the typical low-carber would be interested in.

I'm one who needs to know the foundation of a thing, rather than a simple "do-this" approach. For me, the book is a valuable asset to my library, and I believe it would be for others in the "need to know" mode, also

...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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The Carbohydrate Addict's Diet
by Rachael F. Heller, MA, MPh, PhD and Richard F. Heller, MS, PhD
pub. Penguin Books USA Inc - NY/NY
1991
ISBN 0-451-17339-2

On a scale of 1-5, I give this a 3.

It's a good basic foundation for low-carb, although it isn't on the current cutting-edge (see pub. date).

One of its best features is its explanation of what a carb addict actually is, and eliminates much of the misery we take onto ourselves for it being "our fault", when it's really NOT.
There is good foundational material on insulin interaction.
The book's points are illustrated with case studies.

I was disappointed to see warnings to limit fat intake. This is no longer in the mainstream for low-carb; but it doesn't detract from the other useful information, and can be modified with newer information.

This is a diet plan guide, and as such contains a program, menu plans, recipes, and a brief appendix of carb values for foods.


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


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The Ultimate Weight Solution Food Guide
McGraw, Phillip C.
pub. Pocket Books, NY/NY
2004
710 pages, paperbound
ISBN 0-7434-9039-8

On a scale of 1 - 5, I rate this a 3.

This is a carb counter, based upon a diet plan of the same name. It is NOT a detailed program guide for the diet, but does have some information on how the diet is structured.
Its best feature is the extensive list (over 550 pages) of nutrient values for a wide variety of foods. The list can be a little confusing in some places, since the author has arranged the list by his ranges of metabolic "response" (eg, high-response/high-yield; low response/low yield, etc). This correlates to a degree, possibly, to glycemic index.

There are some good and quick guides and tips on topics such as body weight targets, hunger drivers/suppressors, some meal plans in his program, and eating behaviours and strategies.

I was disappointed in this book also (as in the Carb Addict book) to see recommendations for a lower fat intake than is currently the standard in the low-carb world. But this minor flaw can be corrected by reading with more up-to-date information in mind. It doesn't detract from the benefit of the huge list of food values listed.


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


 current weight: 231.0 
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The Paleo Solution: The Original Human Diet
Robb Wolf
pub. Victory Belt Publishing, Las Vegas NV
2010
320 pages, hardbound
ISBN 978-0-9825658-4-1

On a scale of 1 - 5, I rate this a 4.

This is not strictly a low-carb book. It is one of the several "ancestral" lifestyle books now popular. It is also eminently enjoyable reading, having the style of a conversation with the author, rather than a textbook treatise. The endorsement and foreword by Loren Cordain, another leader in the ancestral movement, lends credibility to the book's direction.

There is good background on the metabolic contributors to our current health dilemmas, and how we got to this point. The discussion follows through to how we can go about correcting the problem, and describes Wolf's plan for achieving it.

An informative chapter on recommended supplements, their uses, and amounts is included.

There are some sample meal plans and recipes.

The author has been a strength and conditioning coach, and as such, there is a nice section (with illustrative photographs) on the types of exercise he's designed to dovetail with his dietary plan.

A 30-page appendix of scientific references, arranged by the book's chapters, follows.

My only very tiny complaint with the book is that *because* it's so readable, it can be less simple to find information than you might be accustomed to in a more "typical" text. There is also no index. If you want to refer back to any point, you have to either have a very good memory or bookmark it or highlight it in some manner.

Overall, another nice book to have in your library.


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


 current weight: 231.0 
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265
207.5
150
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The Rosedale Diet
Ron Rosedale, MD, and Carol Colman
pub. Collins / HarperCollins Publishers, NY/NY
2004
324 pages, paperbound
ISBN 0-06-056572-1

On a scale of 1 - 5, I rate this a 3.

This is a nice introductory book to a low-carb diet plan. It provides very good and thorough foundation into the hormonal science contributing to nutritional metabolism, including insulin and leptin; however, this book isn't as technically weighty as the other reviewed text on that topic in this forum.

I was pleased to see this author (who is introduced by the publisher as "an expert in nutritional and metabolic medicine") has broken away from the demonization of fats, and is more concurrent with modern low-carb plans.

Good, concise, and understandable briefs explain food types, macros, lab tests, and supplements.

Since it is a diet book, you will find structure, food lists, meal plans, and recipes. A couple of nice appendices follow which list some product resources, labs, and a manageable reference section for further scientific information. There are actually *two* indices, which I occasionally get lost in: one is a general topic index, and the other is a recipe index. I like the separation of the two, but I occasionally am frustrated in looking for a topic, only to find I'm searching in the wrong directory!

While it hasn't achieved the popularity of Atkins, I'd rate this diet right up there with that one. I think this would be a very worthy option for those interested in trying low-carb on for size.


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


 current weight: 231.0 
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207.5
150
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Mastering Leptin
Byron J. Richards, CCN, and Mary Guignon Richards
pub. Wellness Resources, Inc. Minneapolis/MN (3rd Ed)
2009
ISBN 978-1-933927-25-1

On a scale of 1 - 5, I rate this a 3.

This is an excellent but more technical discourse on the role of the hormone leptin in our current understanding of clinical nutritional metabolism. It has great information for those who want to further understand the "whys" beyond the "hows" we can gather from numerous other resources. Despite this deeper delve into the science of nutritional metabolics, it is written in a very readable and understandable style. It describes how our bodies communicate through hormones, and how derangement of those processes have led to a range of illnesses and syndromes which we can ameliorate if we learn to modulate and restore those hormonal cues.

Specific maladies are discussed in relation to how our bodies manage or don't manage hormonal influences - and, as with many other current scientific data coming to light, descriptions of "how we got here" abound.

An impressive 25-plus page reference section, set in small print (ie, would be much longer in standard text), follows, detailing many scientific studies to back up the claims and assertions made by the authors. A good index is included.

I really enjoy this book, even though I have to take it in "bites". I am an avid reader with good science background, and I had to go back and re-read and study sections more than once. It's very much a great learning experience, and I'm glad to have it in my library. Others reading for general overview or true basics of diet - especially low-carb (which this is not specific for) - may find it less useful in their own libraries.


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


 current weight: 231.0 
380
322.5
265
207.5
150
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Beyond Atkins
Douglas J. Markham, DC
pub. Pocket Books (Simon & Schuster, Inc.) NY/NY
2005
231 pages, paperbound
ISBN 1-4165-0355-2

On a scale of 1 - 5, I rate this a 2.

This is a modification of the Atkins plan by a chiropractor who has developed a program called "Total Health." He loosely follows the Atkins diet, with some modifications: he reduces the amount of fats, and separates them into healthy and not-healthy ("lean meats", low-fat products); some breads and grains are permitted, along with soy and some seed oils that are considered "non-plan" for many low-carbers.

A list of macronutrient foods are listed with exchange values, and sample menu plans with recipes follow for several options based upon your personalized choices.The Total Health regime requires a bit more attention to the details to accomplish: establishing your needs by BMI, body frame, weight loss goal, and ideal body fat. Frequent meals are promoted, and he promotes eating on schedule for success. A regular, but moderate, exercise program is encouraged and described (with photographs).

Several pages of product and exercise resources round out the book, ending with a short bibliography and index.

This is an interesting adjunct to other low-carb plans, and has some worthwhile points. I would not consider it a first choice in the lifestyle, although some aspects may be more attractive to those wanting to keep a lower fat component and include regular exercise


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


 current weight: 231.0 
380
322.5
265
207.5
150
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The Carbohydrate Addict's Carbohydrate Counter
Rachael F. and Richard F. Heller
pub. Signet (Penguin Putman, Inc.), NY/NY
2000
164 pages, paperbound
ISBN 0-451-20112-4

On a scale of 1 - 5, I rate this a 4.

This is a handy pocket-sized carb counter produced by the authors of the diet book by the same name.

There is a brief opening definition and discussion of carbohydrates and carb addicts, a BMI chart, and a reprint of the USDA's "Range of Desirable Weights" (ie, target values).

The remainder of the book's 160+ pages is devoted to bar-chart carbohydrate values for "more than 4000 food comparisons" (Heller & Heller, 2000). The charts are divided into two segments: each by food category, but one in alphabetic form and the other arranged high-to-low for the group.
The table of contents help direct the reader quickly to the appropriate page(s) for the two versions, a valuable point when needing to find an item quickly.

This book is meant to be a carry-along (4"x6"x1/2" dimensions) to help orient low-carbers in their food choices. It's a very visual guide, and I believe would be a boon to those struggling to make the proper choices for their new dietary plan. Don't expect to see lengthy nutrition datasheets: all you get here is the food and its carb value, which, after all, is the reason for the book in the first place.


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


 current weight: 231.0 
380
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265
207.5
150
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The New Atkins for a New You
Stephen D. Phinney, MD, PhD; Jeff S. Volek, PhD, RD; and Eric C. Westman, MD, MHS
pub. Fireside (Simon & Schuster, Inc.) NY/NY
2010
ISBN 978-1-4391-9027-2

On a scale of 1 - 5, I rate this a 5.

This book is a continuation and update of the diet introduced by the late Dr. Atkins in the early 1970s. It is endorsed in its foreword by a physician from Johns Hopkins Hospital using a version of a low-carb diet (a ketogenic diet) for children with neurologic disorders. The science and documentation for Atkins is now well established, excepting for those who, with bias, will not or cannot accept the information.

The book is, naturally, oriented toward the Atkins dietary plan. Sufficient background information is provided for the new user to understand the reasons and science behind the procedures. Case studies and examples assist this effort.

Food lists and values for the several segments of the diet plan (induction, ongoing weight loss -OWL- and maintenance) are detailed, along with recipes and sample menu plans arranged in handy chart format. Atkins also includes vegetarian/vegan dieters in these sample menu plans. Tips and hints for successful progress are scattered throughout, with troubleshooting suggestions for plateaus, eating out, exercise, bingeing, and expectations for all stages of the diet.

I consider this one of, if not THE, leading dietary plan for low-carb living. It is a simple, structured guide for establishing, monitoring, and achieving dietary health. I recommend Atkins for its ease of acquisition without overburdenment of technical data. Concise and to the point, with good resources and many affirmations from successful followers.

Highly praised and recommended for the dieter's library.


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


 current weight: 231.0 
380
322.5
265
207.5
150
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The Primal Blueprint
Mark Sisson
pub. Primal Nutrition, Inc., Malibu CA
2009
283 pages, hardbound
ISBN 978-0-9822077-0-3

On a scale of 1 - 5, I rate this a 4.

Written by the author of a very popular and informative blogspot called "Mark's Daily Apple", this book is another leader in the "ancestral" lifestyle revolution. It is very readable, and centers around a character named "Grok" created to embody the principles discussed in the book.

Its basic premise is a short series of simple behaviours to follow to achieve optimal health under the author's guidelines. Hypothetical case studies illustrate important points and variances.

A couple of summary pages of "Primal Approved" and "Primal Avoid" examples simplify matters. Each chapter comes with a summary page as well.

There are some good examples of macronutrient calculations, and the classic Primal Carbohydrate Curve (explained in two places).

There is ample foundational material on the metabolic processes involved in nutrition (such as insulin), discussion of intermittent fasting and a ketogenic diet, warnings or endorsements of specific foods (such as grains, soy, or pastured products), and many disease processes and other syndromes which can be improved by the adoption of a Primal lifestyle.

This book is also, to some degree, a "diet" book, although that portion is brief and mostly exemplary, consisting of a couple of pages of what the author ate in compliance with his plan over a given few days.

A good index will help readers find key points.

This is another "must-have" book for the library, even though it's not strictly a low-carb text.


...the problem with people these days is
they've forgotten we're really just animals ...
(attributation forgotten)

We did not create the web of life; we are but a strand in it.
~attributed to Chief Seattle

We don't have souls. We ARE souls. We have bodies.
~C.S. Lewis


 current weight: 231.0 
380
322.5
265
207.5
150
HELEN_BRU's Photo HELEN_BRU Posts: 14,765
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I just picked up Mary Hyman's Blood Sugar Solution. I read all his books.

Helen

MountainTime ---- Calgary, Alberta, Canada

BD/6/20


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This is a place to post book reviews, blog reviews, video reviews and other resources that you want to share with this group.

BE THE CHANGE YOU WANT TO SEE IN OTHERS.

http://whippetsandducks.weebly.com/




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